South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame


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Established in 1991, the South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame honors pioneers and leaders in the aviation industry who have made significant contributions to the development, advancement or promotion of aviation and have close ties to the State of South Carolina.

 

Aviation Hall of Fame Criteria

It is not necessary to have a Hall of Fame or Aviator of the Year inductee every year. Up to three nominees for the SCAA Hall of Fame honorees can be inducted each year and one Aviator of the Year. The individual must be of good character. The individual’s contribution to aviation must be substantial and performed with a high degree of excellence, above and beyond the performance of one’s job or political position. The individual’s contribution may be a single gallant event or achievement over time that has made a lasting impact on aviation. A single gallant event will be defined as an event, which was brave, spirited and honorable. Examples are William Farrow and Ronald McNair.

Nominees shall be reviewed by the appropriate FAA or DOA officials to ensure there are no concerns or reasons why the person should not be nominated. Nominations shall expire after the first consideration and must be resubmitted for future consideration. The individual nominated must have been born in South Carolina and made their contribution to aviation in this state or elsewhere; OR have been a native of another state and made their contribution to aviation in South Carolina. Nominations must include verifiable documentation of the individual’s contribution to aviation to include the following: A biographical resume (as detailed as possible), documentation, clippings, citations, and awards regarding the contribution to aviation. No consideration will be given to any information other than that submitted with the nomination package. Aviation Hall of Fame committee members shall only consider information submitted in the written nomination package. No other information supplied by anyone to the Aviation Hall of Fame committee members or to SCAA board members will be considered.

Hall of Fame Nomination Form Hall of Fame Video

 

Aviator of the Year Criteria

hall-of-fame-picIn addition to the above: The Aviator of the Year must be a living person. The nominee should be a true aviator (pilot or flight crew member). The nominee’s accomplishment in aviation should be verifiable and attached to the application. The nominee should have achievements above and beyond a normal pilot. All Nominees shall: Have demonstrated ethical conduct and responsibility toward associates in the industry and community. Have had substantial influence in promoting and preserving the state’s aviation industry. Have contributed to the positive image of South Carolina as viewed from the state and national level. Maintained a high level of respect within the state’s aviation community for service, performance and public service.

 

South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame license tags are now available for inductees.

hall-of-fame-plateAll South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame inductees are eligible to apply for the license tag. If you would like to purchase a license tag you will need to complete the MV-95 application and send it to the SCDMV to PO Box 1498, Blythewood SC 29016-0008. There is no additional registration fee from the association for the license tags.

If you desire to order more than one tag, please duplicate the application form and complete one form for each tag. For your first tag call SCAA headquarters to get a vehicle plate number to include on the MV-95 application form. This is what will be printed on your license tag. If you choose to order multiple tags you will need to contact association headquarters at 1-877-359-7222 to receive another number for the second license tag. You will need to include a letter along with your application from the association that verifies that you are a member of the SC Aviation Hall of Fame. If you have any questions on the process please call SCAA headquarters at 1-877-359-7222.

Download MV-95 form

SCAA created an traveling Hall of Fame display, if you would like to display this exhibit at your airport for 3 months, email scaa@scaaonline.com

South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame Inductees:


John T. Talbert

John T. Talbert

1995 By the time he finished high school, John Talbert had become interested in both aviation and engineering. He was graduated from Military College of South Carolina (now the Citadel) in 1943 with a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and was commissioned in the U.S. Army as a second Lieutenant. After the war, he joined the Civil Aeronautics Administration. He began to fly and soloed in 1947. Talbert worked as deputy director of the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission, establishing himself as one of the foremost airport engineers in the Southeast. In 1954, he went into private practice and later founded Talbert, Cox and Associates, which served as the ”engineer of record” for every airport in South Carolina. His motivation was his devotion to client satisfaction and to providing cutting edge airport...

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Representative Robert Walker

Representative Robert Walker

2007 Representative Bob Walker learned to fly while an ROTC Cadet at the University of South Carolina, under the watchful eyes of SCAA Hall of Famers Frances Miller and Sylvia Roth. In 1966, Walker was commissioned as an officer and pilot in the U.S. Air Force, a role for which he has received much recognition and several commendations. Elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives in 1993, he has been a tireless proponent of general aviation in South Carolina. In 2003, Walker introduced House Bill 72, which later became law and allows counties to lower aircraft property tax from 10.5 to four percent. Walker also introduced House Bill 4537 in January 2004 and gained unanimous support for this bill in the House. In January 2005, the bill became law, reestablishing the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission. Walker’s dedication to aviation has truly had a lasting impact on South Carolina’s aviation...

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Joseph B. Wilder

Joseph B. Wilder

1994 Joseph Wilder graduated from the University of Georgia in 1947. He served in the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1987 to present, where he is chairman of several committees. Wilder was a member of the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission from 1956-1986, serving as chairman from 1978-1984. He was selected chairman emeritus in 1993. Wilder was names Legislator of the Year in 1993, Chamber of Commerce Man of the Year in 1987 and the recipient of the National Peabody Award for community service in 1954. He was graduated from Army flight school in class of 44 and served in the 10th and 14th Air Force. He has owned several radio stations and was named to the Broadcasters Hall of...

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Ellie Givan “Buck” Shuler, Jr., Lt. General, USAF, Ret.

Ellie Givan “Buck” Shuler, Jr., Lt. General, USAF, Ret.

2012 General Shuler’s love of flying began during the years of WWII, when he was able to understand and follow the war effort, particularly the air war. It was the genesis of his desire to become a pilot. He grew up in Orangeburg and in Caracas, Venezuela where his dad was a partner in a Cessna 140. When the family returned from Venezuela in 1949, his interest in learning to fly increased and in 1954 he soloed at Jennings Field in Orangeburg under the instruction of Aviation Hall of Famer T.C. Hadwin. The general holds a single and multi-engine land rating along with an instrument rating as well as a N265 class rating. General Shuler attended The Citadel and majored in Civil Engineering. He was president of The Citadel Flying Club his senior year.  Following completion of the Air Force ROTC program, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant on 6 June 1959 as a distinguished graduate. He entered active duty on 18 July and began pilot training. First came preflight training at Lackland AFB, then Primary at Moore AB and then jet basic training at Laredo AFB all in Texas, receiving his wings on 2 September 1960. His first operational assignment was as a B-52 pilot and then aircraft commander at Carswell AFB and Dyess AFB respectively in Texas. During these tours he flew 22 nuclear airborne alert missions of 24 to 25 hours in duration in the B-52, six of which were flown during the 1962 Cuban Crisis. Following graduation from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a Masters degree in Engineering Management in June 1967, the general was assigned to check out as an aircraft commander in the F-4D Phantom II at George AFB, CA. A combat tour followed with the 12th Tactical Fighter Wing at Cam Ranh Bay Air Base in Vietnam. He served as a flight leader flying 107 combat missions over North Vietnam, South Vietnam and Laos. He also flew 15 combat support missions in the F-4C along the Korean demilitarized zone as well as 57 training missions at Taegu AB, Korea during the Pueblo Crisis. Following the combat tour in 1969, General Shuler was assigned to Headquarters 2nd Air Force, Barksdale AFB, LA. as a civil engineering officer becoming the Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Civil Engineering. Additionally, he served as an instructor in the T-39 aircraft during this assignment. In 1972 he was assigned as assistant executive officer to the Commander in Chief of US Air Forces in Europe at Lindsey Air Station, Wiesbaden, West Germany, which moved to Ramstein Air Base, West Germany in May 1973. There he served as the Base Civil Engineer and Commander of the 86th Civil Engineering Squadron. Later, upon returning to the States, he became Director of Programs for Engineering and Services at Strategic Air Command Headquarters. He was selected in 1977 to be the Executive Officer to the SAC Commander in Chief. Over the next several years he commanded two B-52 Bomb Wings, two SAC Air Divisions and served as the Director of Operations for SAC. In March 1988 General Shuler took command of the Eighth Air Force, a command of 57,000 personnel operating B-52, B-1B and FB-111 bombers, KC-135 and KC-10 tankers and TR-1 reconnaissance aircraft. The command would play key roles during operations...

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John “Henry” Luke Williamson

John “Henry” Luke Williamson

2005 John Henry “Luke” Williamson was born on April 18, 1906 and raised in Ninety Six. In 1927, he entered the US Army as an Air Cadet, finished in 1928, and became an instructor of cadets at Brooks Field, TX (later Brooks AFB). The 14th Air Force Historical Office Staff would later write: “He was one of the finest instructors ever stationed at Brooks Field.” Williamson went from reserve to active duty in 1930 as an instructor at the Air Corp Tactical School (ACTS) at Maxwell Field, Al. (later Maxwell AFB). While an Air Cadet and instructor, Williamson would fly his Boeing P-12 bi-plane to his family home in Ninety Six, perform acrobatics for the locals, and land next to his family home on an airstrip he had prepared for this purpose. These occasions were looked forward to and witnessed by Senator John Drummond as a young boy, along with other local residents. Thus, Williamson is attributed with having established the first airstrip in the Greenwood Ninety Six area. In 1932, the Army Air Corp. created its first acrobatic flying team. Williamson was named as one of the first three pilots. First named the “Dixie Trio,” they soon became dubbed “The Flying Trapeze.” The Flying Trapeze flew bi-wing Boeing P-12’s. Colonel Mao Pangchu of China saw Williamson in a show and offered him a lucrative position in China as advisor and instructor for the Chinese Air Force. Returning home in 1942, he joined Delta Airlines as Chief Check Pilot and kept that position until he died of a stroke in 1957 in...

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