South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame


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Established in 1991, the South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame honors pioneers and leaders in the aviation industry who have made significant contributions to the development, advancement or promotion of aviation and have close ties to the State of South Carolina.

 

Aviation Hall of Fame Criteria

It is not necessary to have a Hall of Fame or Aviator of the Year inductee every year. Up to three nominees for the SCAA Hall of Fame honorees can be inducted each year and one Aviator of the Year. The individual must be of good character. The individual’s contribution to aviation must be substantial and performed with a high degree of excellence, above and beyond the performance of one’s job or political position. The individual’s contribution may be a single gallant event or achievement over time that has made a lasting impact on aviation. A single gallant event will be defined as an event, which was brave, spirited and honorable. Examples are William Farrow and Ronald McNair.

Nominees shall be reviewed by the appropriate FAA or DOA officials to ensure there are no concerns or reasons why the person should not be nominated. Nominations shall expire after the first consideration and must be resubmitted for future consideration. The individual nominated must have been born in South Carolina and made their contribution to aviation in this state or elsewhere; OR have been a native of another state and made their contribution to aviation in South Carolina. Nominations must include verifiable documentation of the individual’s contribution to aviation to include the following: A biographical resume (as detailed as possible), documentation, clippings, citations, and awards regarding the contribution to aviation. No consideration will be given to any information other than that submitted with the nomination package. Aviation Hall of Fame committee members shall only consider information submitted in the written nomination package. No other information supplied by anyone to the Aviation Hall of Fame committee members or to SCAA board members will be considered.

Hall of Fame Nomination Form Hall of Fame Video

 

Aviator of the Year Criteria

hall-of-fame-picIn addition to the above: The Aviator of the Year must be a living person. The nominee should be a true aviator (pilot or flight crew member). The nominee’s accomplishment in aviation should be verifiable and attached to the application. The nominee should have achievements above and beyond a normal pilot. All Nominees shall: Have demonstrated ethical conduct and responsibility toward associates in the industry and community. Have had substantial influence in promoting and preserving the state’s aviation industry. Have contributed to the positive image of South Carolina as viewed from the state and national level. Maintained a high level of respect within the state’s aviation community for service, performance and public service.

 

South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame license tags are now available for inductees.

hall-of-fame-plateAll South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame inductees are eligible to apply for the license tag. If you would like to purchase a license tag you will need to complete the MV-95 application and send it to the SCDMV to PO Box 1498, Blythewood SC 29016-0008. There is no additional registration fee from the association for the license tags.

If you desire to order more than one tag, please duplicate the application form and complete one form for each tag. For your first tag call SCAA headquarters to get a vehicle plate number to include on the MV-95 application form. This is what will be printed on your license tag. If you choose to order multiple tags you will need to contact association headquarters at 1-877-359-7222 to receive another number for the second license tag. You will need to include a letter along with your application from the association that verifies that you are a member of the SC Aviation Hall of Fame. If you have any questions on the process please call SCAA headquarters at 1-877-359-7222.

Download MV-95 form

SCAA created an traveling Hall of Fame display, if you would like to display this exhibit at your airport for 3 months, email scaa@scaaonline.com

South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame Inductees:


Bevo Howard

Bevo Howard

1991 Bevo Howard founded Hawthorne School of Aviation in 1941 in Orangeburg, and he trained more than 6,000 pilots there. A World War II pilot, he was most famous for his aerobatic titles, including three aerobatic world championships and three international championships. The first pilot to perform an outside loop in a light plane, his most famous feat was an Inverted Ribbon Pickup where he would fly upside down and grab a ribbon. At age 22, he became the youngest airline pilot. He established Hawthorne Aviation, a fixed base operation in Charleston and a multi-million dollar business. The web has many pages devoted to this outstanding aviator, the best place to start is:http://www.bevhoward.com This site is maintained by Bevo’s son and is highly recommended. Other sites: Bob Russell relates the TRUE details of Bevo’s last flight. http://spence-air-base.com/bevo.html http://proairshow.com/ Proairshow.com Carolina Airshow History http://www.boshears.com/danhist/history.html http://www.avweb.com/other/eaa9943.html http://www.richland2.k12.sc.us/rce/transpor.htm...

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M. B. “Dusty” Huggins

M. B. “Dusty” Huggins

1996 Dusty Huggins is one of America’s most colorful and successful fliers engaged in agricultural spraying and dusting. He started flying in the late 1920s. He started Huggins Airpark in Timmonsville in 1937, and in 1938, he became a charter member of the South Carolina Breakfast Club. He joined a new company known as Delta Airlines in 1941, participating in the company’s crop dusting venture. In 1946, Huggins started his own aerial application business in South Carolina, and he later pioneered aerial pest control in North Dakota. In 1955, he began working with SLED, looking for liquor stills as well as people, whether lost or fugitives from the law. Huggins located more than 10,000 stills while working with SLED, and saved at least 15 people. His dog Edgar was his constant companion for 16 years and flew more than a million air miles with him. Huggins is known to have given more free flying lessons than those for which he was paid. Although a master yarn spinner and a hard-core practical joker, he was all business during instruction. His job called for precision and, as one friend said, “Dusty is a big man who climbs into a small plane and flies with an exactness that is nothing short of spectacular.” Now THIS is a home airport Bill Walker 4/7/2005 Huggins Memorial Airpark at Timmonsville, S.C., is long on flying history and short on formality. For visitors, that means it takes about five minutes to go from introductions to a first-name basis with regulars at the airfield (58J), which lies directly beside S.C. Highway 76 on the outskirts of Timmonsville in the Pee Dee area near Florence. The personality of one man, M.B. “Dusty” Huggins II, dominates the history of the field. Huggins carved out a 30- by 1,400-foot strip on the site in 1931. Over the next 40 or so years, he taught more than 150 people to fly and helped popularize general aviation in South Carolina. Today, Huggins Memorial’s runway is 150 by 3,675 feet of well-manicured grass. The place is run by M.B. Huggins III, whom everyone calls Sonny. “There are currently 40 planes hangared here,” he says. “We have every kind of plane from Tri-Pacer to T-6 to Nanchang CJ-6. I think we’ve got the most planes of any grass strip in the state.” There is also a small airpark with a number of houses at the end of the field. “But we have always completely maintained the field and the lights,” he says. On a recent Sunday afternoon, Huggins welcomed visitors and a dozen or so regulars to the main hangar, which is packed with memorabilia from nearly 75 years of Huggins family flying experiences. There’s a comfortable corner with easy chairs and a couch where most of the hangar flying is done. Sonny’s wife, Bettie, is usually at his side, while designated airfield chef Billy Parker is never far away. Parker is responsible for the delicious chicken bog meals that regularly draw a good turnout of visitors. “People here remember Mr. Huggins,” said Bettie, as she stood by the memorial marker at the entrance to the field. “His spirit is still here.” Sonny Huggins noted his father, who was named to the South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame in 1995, pioneered crop spraying in...

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Benjamin Franklin Johnson

Benjamin Franklin Johnson

2005 In 1936, Benjamin Franklin Johnson purchased a disabled plane, restored it and then learned to fly. Southern Airways and Southern Airways School employed Johnson from 1942 to 1944. He also taught in the Clemson and University of Georgia CPT Programs. Johnson served as civilian instructor in the Army Primary Program at Camden during WWII and operated a flight program for air force cadets in Anderson. He flew more than 3,000 hours in a PT-22 Stearman during those years. Ultimately, he logged more than 10,000 hours total. In 1945, Johnson started Carolina Aero Service in Anderson, along with four partners. He operated the school until 1972. During his tenure, he received the nickname “Mr. Anderson Airport.” Through Carolina Aero he provided charter service, fuels, aircraft maintenance, flight instruction, hanger and storage services, aerial photography and mapping. Johnson served as a FAA Flight Examiner from 1951 to 1974. He was a flight instructor, ground instructor and held many aircraft engine mechanic ratings. He also wrote a weekly column for the Anderson Independent and Daily Mail called “Planes and Pilots” in the 1960’s. Johnson’s love of airplanes lead to his hobby of restoring old aircraft, including the 1929 Clemson ‘372,’ the Clemson Aero Club Plane that is last known to be housed in the South Carolina State Museum in...

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General Hansford T. Johnson

General Hansford T. Johnson

2005 General Johnson was born in 1936, in Aiken, S.C. He graduated from high school in 1953 and then attended Clemson College. He was the outstanding graduate in thermodynamics and aerodynamics from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1959, received a master’s degree in aeronautics from Stanford University In 1967 and a master’s degree in business from the University of Colorado in 1970. The general completed Squadron Officer School in 1965, Army Command and General Staff College in 1972, National War College in 1976, and the advanced management program at Dartmouth College in 1980. He earned his navigator wings while a cadet at the academy. Upon graduation, he attended flying training at Bartow Air Base, Fla., and then Laredo Air Force Base, Texas, receiving his pilot wings in July 1960. His first operational assignment was to the 317th Troop Carrier Wing, Evreux-Fauville Air Base, France, where he flew C-130 transports throughout Europe, Africa, the Middle East and West Asia. He continued flying with the 317th when it transferred to Lockbourne Air Force Base, Ohio. After completing graduate school at Stanford University, General Johnson volunteered for duty In South Vietnam. In 1967 he flew as a forward air controller In support of the South Vietnamese army and U.S. Marine Corps forces in the northern province and the demilitarized zone. He directed tactical close air support strike missions against enemy supply, storage, vehicle and troop targets. During the latter half of the year, he operated out of Plelku Air Base, along the Ho Chi Minh trail, at night. During his tour, he flew 423 combat missions, 71 of which were over North Vietnam or the demilitarized zone. From May 1968 to July 1971 General Johnson was an instructor and assistant professor of aeronautics at the U.S. Air Force Academy. After graduating from Army Command and General Staff College, he served three years in the Plans Directorate, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. During his first year he was in charge of developing the tactical airlift force structure, then became leader of the team that developed and evaluated Air Force inputs to military strategy. The general graduated from National War College in June 1976 and then was assigned to the 93rd Bombardment Wing, Castle Air Force Base, Calif., as assistant deputy commander for operations. He also performed duties as assistant deputy commander for maintenance, deputy commander for operations and vice commander. He was commander of the 22nd Bombardment Wing at March Air Force Base, Calif., from April 1979 until February 1981. General Johnson then was assigned to Headquarters Strategic Air Command, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., as assistant deputy chief of staff for plans. In November 1982 the general returned to Air Force headquarters as deputy director of programs and evaluation, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, Plans and Resources, and was chairman of the Program Review Committee. He was director of programs and evaluation, and chairman of the Air Staff Board, from July 1984 to October 1985, when he became deputy chief of staff for operations at SAC headquarters. In December 1986 he was assigned as vice commander in chief, Pacific Air Forces, Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. In August 1987 General Johnson became deputy commander in chief of the U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., during Earnest...

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Howell C. “Nick” Jones

Howell C. “Nick” Jones

1998 A native of Orangeburg, Howell C. “Nick” Jones served the military in the World War II Training Command as an Army Air Corps Aviation Cadet at Auburn University and in the navy as an Aviation Cadet. In 1964, Jones began construction of a Cassutt race plane, which he finished in less than 15 months. In 1955, he flew his first air race and for 11 years he was involved in Formula One racing. After the first “straight” Cassutt, he built two other modified versions of the same plane. A leader in the sport himself, he was the founder, promoter and organizer of the Oshkosh 500, an efficiency acclaimed as the “the race at which it’s impossible to cheat.” Jones’ strong interest in designing aircraft resulted in the creation of the White Lighting, a four-seat aircraft that set three world speed records. Jones continues his involvement with the design, manufacturing and sale of highly advanced, two-stroke engines for aircraft, boats, cars and industrial machinery. In 1998, he was named South Carolina Aviator of the...

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Carroll Joye

Carroll Joye

2003 A Bamberg native, Carroll Joye entered the U.S. Force in 1957 and retired 22 years later as a Senior Master Sergeant. His foreign tours of duty included Germany, North Africa, Italy, Greenland, Southeast Asia-Vietnam, Thailand and Spain. Tours of duty in the United States included Georgia, South Carolina, New York, Arizona, Ohio, Illinois, Florida and New Mexico. Joye began his civilian aviation career in 1971, while on military tour of duty at Torrejon AB in Madrid, Spain. He earned his commercial and flight instructor’s rating through the tutelage of Heirs Furtick. As Orangeburg County Airport manager, his approval of the plans and tireless work on the construction of the Aviation Memorial and Pilot’s Walk also led to the creation of the Orangeburg Pilot’s Association. Having taught about 750 students to fly, issuing approximately 1,500 licenses/ratings, and logging some 16,500 hours of flight time, his name will be included in aviation lore for decades. Including his air force career time, Joye has been involved in aviation for almost 45...

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Senator Phil Leventis

Senator Phil Leventis

2006 Senator Phil Leventis has been associated with all “things in aviation” in South Carolina and around the world from the time he was born on November 3, 1945 at the Columbia Army Air Base Hospital, which is now the Columbia Metropolitan Airport. Leventis was actually the last baby born before the hospital closed after World War II. As a teenager, he returned to the Columbia Airport numerous times to watch the airplanes take off and land. He began flying lessons at Columbia Metro in June 1965 and earned his private license in August. South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame member Francis Miller administered his first flight test, which lasted 50 minutes. In 1967, he earned his Commercial License after a 35-minute test with Ms. Miller. Later that same year, he earned his instructor’s rating after only a 20-minute flight. He earned additional ratings, including his commercial glider rating at Chester in 1967 and a single engine seaplane rating in 1972 from the legendary Jack Brown in Florida. His first jobs in aviation were pumping gas for the old H&H Aviation at CAE during the summer as well as Holiday Aviation in Charlottesville, Va. during the school year in the late ‘60s. After earning his instructor rating in 1967, he taught in Charlottesville during the school year and at a Civil Air Patrol camp at the Reno/Stead Airport in Nevada during the summer of 1968. He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1969 with a Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering and earned a commission in the US Air Force as a Second Lieutenant. He began Under Graduate Pilot Training in the Air Force in July 1969, the week man first walk on the moon. Many years later, he would meet South Carolina’s “moon man,” General Charles Dukes. Upon completion of pilot training, Phil became an instructor in advance jets, T-38, and taught both USAF and German AF students at Shepard AFB, Texas. In 1974, he left active duty and entered the South Carolina Air National Guard, rising to the rank of Brigadier General and serving as commander when he retired in 1999. He continued to fly civilian aircrafts, earning his multi-engine and civilian instrument ratings in the early ‘70s. He purchased his first of 11 airplanes in 1972. It was a 1959 Cessna 182. Subsequently, he has owned and operated a 1963 Mooney M20C, a 1966PA-30Twin Comanche, a 1969, Cessna 310, two 1974 PA-31 Navajos, a 1975 Cessna 340, a 1974 Beech Barron, a 1972 Cessna 421, a Polish Koliber and a IS-28 Lark glider built in Romania. During his flying career, Phil has piloted more than 65 different aircrafts and amassed more than 8,000 flying hours — 3,700 Air Force jets, more than 2,000 hours in a single engine fighter type aircraft as well as 4,400 hours in civilian aircrafts ranging from hang gliders to helicopters to pressurized twins. In the early 1990s, due to the fact that the local repair station operator was retiring in Sumter leaving no maintenance services available in the community, Phil and a partner purchased and operated Dixie Aeronautical for four years. Phil’s flying experience includes operations from Central American to Alaska and from Hawaii to Saudi Arabia and Iraq. He has piloted aircraft across the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and flown combat...

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Elliot Huger ” Billy” Lynam, Jr.

Elliot Huger ” Billy” Lynam, Jr.

1995 Billy Lynam’s involvement in aviation spans more than five decades. He soloed in 1932 and in the late 1930’s, he opened a flying school at Sumter Airport. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a commissioned officer and instructor pilot. After the war, he reopened the Sumter County Airport; serving as its operator until 1976 and as manager until 1981. Lynam served as FAA Pilot Examiner and Accident Prevention counselor. He founded Sumter Airways, Inc. and Sumter Aero Applicators, Inc. A past president of the South Carolina Agriculture Aviation Association, he is also a member of the South Carolina Breakfast Club. He was in the first group of QBs in South Carolina, in the Columbia Hangar. One of South Carolina’s aviation pioneers; he has devoted most of his life to...

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Dexter C. Martin

Dexter C. Martin

1991 Dexter Martin began flying as a” Barn Stormer” and obtained his pilot’s license in 1919, which was signed by Orville Wright. He toured the Southeast in the famed Mabel Cody’s Flying Circus. In 1935, the South Carolina Legislature created the state Aeronautics Commission, and Martin was its first executive director. During World War II, he developed the Lexington County Airport to base a special Defense Landing Program known as Doolittle’s Raiders. He established the Palmetto School of Aeronautics for aviation mechanism and was inducted into the Aviation Pioneers Hall of Fame in 1976. The photo of Lt. Col. Dexter C. Martin was taken in 1941 as Commander of the SC Civil Air Patrol, a position held from 1941 through 1946. Link to Mabel Cody’s Flying Circus webpage Aviation in South Carolina Thanks to the Rice Creek Elementary School Dexter Martin (1897 – 1982), a barnstormer turned aeronautics commissioner, guided the development of aviation in South Carolina through several decades of its fastest growth. “Things were a lot different then. Airplanes had no instruments like today’s airplanes . . . . If you weren’t sure where you were, you landed and asked somebody.” Dexter Martin (Note: Martin did suggest painting the town’s name on the roof of a building.) Martin began flying in 1919 when he took lessons with Amelia Earhart. He came to South Carolina in the late 1920’s as a barnstormer in Mabel Cody’s Flying Circus. As Martin flew the airplane, Miss Cody, niece of Wild West showman Buffalo Bill Cody, climbed out of the plane on a rope ladder and painted “WOCO PEP” (the name of the airplane fuel maker that sponsored her) on the wing. The show visited Camden, Bennettsville, Orangeburg and many other towns. Martin earned his first pilot license in 1924. It was issued in six languages and was signed by Orville Wright. In 1935, Martin was named the first director of the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission. He helped develop many of the state’s important aviation centers, including Columbia Metropolitan Airport and Shaw, McEntire and Myrtle Beach air force bases....

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Barnie B. McEntire, Jr

Barnie B. McEntire, Jr

1992 Barnie McEntire’s love of aviation began as a teenager when he washed Piper Cubs at Columbia’s Owens Field. After graduating from the University of South Carolina, he entered pilot training in 1939, earned his pilot’s wings in 1940 in the Army Air Corps and began a 22-year military career. He served in World War II as chief pilot for Air Transport Command’s North Atlantic Division flying B-24 bombers. In 1946, he organized the first South Carolina Air National Guard units. On February 18, 1959, he earned rank of Brigadier General. He became the first Air National Guard pilot to be proficient in flying a Mach 3 F-104 Star fighter jet in 1960. In November 1961, the Congaree Air Base was officially renamed to honor his dynamic military career as a pilot, general and patriot. McEntire Joint National Guard Station From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search McEntire Joint National Guard Station (JNGS) is affiliated with the South Carolina Air National Guard (SCANG). It is located in Eastover, South Carolina and is approximately 15 miles southeast of Columbia. McEntire JNGS is named for the late Brigadier General Barnie B. McEntire, Jr., the first commander of the SCANG and its first general officer. McEntire died in May 1961 when he rode his malfunctioning F-104 into the Susquehannah River to avoid crashing in the populated area of Harrisburg, PA. The base was previously known as Congaree Air Base and was used in World War II as a U.S. Marine Corps training base. It was re-named McEntire ANG Base in October 1961 by Governor Ernest F. Hollings. It was re-named McEntire Joint National Guard Station in 2005 to reflect the joint presence of Army and Air National Guard units. The South Carolina Air National Guard was formed in December 1946. Today 1,250 members train at McEntire JNGS. About 900 of those are traditional Guard men and women. About 300 are full-time federal employees (technicians). About 50 are state employees (some of them are also traditional Guard members). The 169th Fighter Wing is the primary unit of the SCANG. Wing units include the: 157th Fighter Squadron 169th Maintenance Squadron 169th Aircraft Generation Squadron 169th Logistics Squadron 169th Civil Engineering Squadron 169th Security Forces Squadron 169th Services Flight 169th Mission Support Flight 169th Logistics Support Flight 169th Operations Support Flight 169th Communications Squadron 169th Medical Squadron The mission of the 169th FW is to maintain wartime readiness and the ability to mobilize and deploy expeditiously to carry out tactical air missions or combat support activities in the event of a war or military emergency. The SCANG operates as part of the Total Force of the U.S. military and is fully integrated with the active duty Air Force to perform its military mission. The South Carolina Air National Guard also has a state mission, to respond to the call of the governor in the event of natural disaster or domestic disturbance. The 169th FW flies the F-16 Fighting Falcon, a single-seat multi-purpose fighter with the capability to fly at up to twice the speed of sound. The 169th flew the F-16A from 1983-1994. In 1994 the wing transitioned to the F-16C/Block 52, the newest, most advanced F-16 in the Air Force. The SCANG also flies a C-130 Hercules for airlift support. Also located...

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