South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame


hof-93bryant-scan007

Browse Hall of Fame

Established in 1991, the South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame honors pioneers and leaders in the aviation industry who have made significant contributions to the development, advancement or promotion of aviation and have close ties to the State of South Carolina.

 

Aviation Hall of Fame Criteria

It is not necessary to have a Hall of Fame or Aviator of the Year inductee every year. Up to three nominees for the SCAA Hall of Fame honorees can be inducted each year and one Aviator of the Year. The individual must be of good character. The individual’s contribution to aviation must be substantial and performed with a high degree of excellence, above and beyond the performance of one’s job or political position. The individual’s contribution may be a single gallant event or achievement over time that has made a lasting impact on aviation. A single gallant event will be defined as an event, which was brave, spirited and honorable. Examples are William Farrow and Ronald McNair.

Nominees shall be reviewed by the appropriate FAA or DOA officials to ensure there are no concerns or reasons why the person should not be nominated. Nominations shall expire after the first consideration and must be resubmitted for future consideration. The individual nominated must have been born in South Carolina and made their contribution to aviation in this state or elsewhere; OR have been a native of another state and made their contribution to aviation in South Carolina. Nominations must include verifiable documentation of the individual’s contribution to aviation to include the following: A biographical resume (as detailed as possible), documentation, clippings, citations, and awards regarding the contribution to aviation. No consideration will be given to any information other than that submitted with the nomination package. Aviation Hall of Fame committee members shall only consider information submitted in the written nomination package. No other information supplied by anyone to the Aviation Hall of Fame committee members or to SCAA board members will be considered.

Hall of Fame Nomination Form Hall of Fame Video

 

Aviator of the Year Criteria

hall-of-fame-picIn addition to the above: The Aviator of the Year must be a living person. The nominee should be a true aviator (pilot or flight crew member). The nominee’s accomplishment in aviation should be verifiable and attached to the application. The nominee should have achievements above and beyond a normal pilot. All Nominees shall: Have demonstrated ethical conduct and responsibility toward associates in the industry and community. Have had substantial influence in promoting and preserving the state’s aviation industry. Have contributed to the positive image of South Carolina as viewed from the state and national level. Maintained a high level of respect within the state’s aviation community for service, performance and public service.

 

South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame license tags are now available for inductees.

hall-of-fame-plateAll South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame inductees are eligible to apply for the license tag. If you would like to purchase a license tag you will need to complete the MV-95 application and send it to the SCDMV to PO Box 1498, Blythewood SC 29016-0008. There is no additional registration fee from the association for the license tags.

If you desire to order more than one tag, please duplicate the application form and complete one form for each tag. For your first tag call SCAA headquarters to get a vehicle plate number to include on the MV-95 application form. This is what will be printed on your license tag. If you choose to order multiple tags you will need to contact association headquarters at 1-877-359-7222 to receive another number for the second license tag. You will need to include a letter along with your application from the association that verifies that you are a member of the SC Aviation Hall of Fame. If you have any questions on the process please call SCAA headquarters at 1-877-359-7222.

Download MV-95 form

SCAA created an traveling Hall of Fame display, if you would like to display this exhibit at your airport for 3 months, email scaa@scaaonline.com

South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame Inductees:


Major Rudolf Anderson Jr.

Major Rudolf Anderson Jr.

2008 Major Rudolf Anderson Jr. was born in Spartanburg in 1927. His family relocated to Greenville, and in 1944, he graduated from Greenville High school. After earning a degree in textile engineering from Clemson Agricultural College in 1948, Anderson worked briefly in textile manufacturing. He joined the U.S. Air Force in 1951 and graduated from flight school in 1953. Anderson was assigned to the 15th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, based at Kimpo, Korea, where he flew the RF-86 over the denied territories of the Soviet Union and China. He earned the Distinguished Flying Cross with two bronze Oak Leaf Clusters. In 1957, Anderson was selected to fly the top secret, high flying U-2 reconnaissance plane, often flying at altitudes higher than 72,000 feet for extended periods of time. During the 13 days of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Anderson made the second U-2 flight over Cuba on October 15, 1962. His photographs showed additional new ballistic missile sites under construction. The first mission over Cuba by another U-2 pilot was the previous day, October 14. As the tension between the Soviet Union and the U.S., additional pilots were assigned missions in the U-2s, and additional missiles and their state of readiness were uncovered. On October 25, Capt. Eugene “Jerry” Mcllmoyle was flying over Banes, Cuba when two SAMS were fired at and narrowly missed his U-2. The U-2 missions were halted for the next day, and Major Anderson volunteered the following day, Saturday, October 27, 1962. It was on this Saturday that Anderson, while believed to be flying above 72,000 feet over Banes, Cuba, was killed and his U-2 destroyed as two SAMS detonated. The downing of Major Anderson’s plane prompted President John F. Kennedy to warn Premier Nikita Khrushchev that “strong and overwhelming retaliatory action would be taken unless he received immediate notice that the missiles would be withdrawn.” Within 24 hours of Anderson’s death, Khrushchev told Kennedy the missiles would come out. (Paragraph from the memoirs of Bobby Kennedy.) For his supreme sacrifice, Major Anderson was awarded the first Air Force Cross, the Purple Heart and the Cheney...

read more

Samuel F. Austin

Samuel F. Austin

1994 Born in High Point, NC, Samuel Austin was educated at North Carolina State and Georgia Tech. He served in Vietnam as an Army Officer and worked in industry and local government. Austin holds a commercial pilot’s license with multi-engine, helicopter and instrument ratings. Prior to becoming ADO Manager in 1985, his career spanned 18 years with the Department of Transportation, and he served the airports divisions of four FAA regions. Austin was a special friend to South Carolina airports, presiding over millions of dollars of improvements in the Palmetto State and turning a declining infrastructure into strong assets for our communities. He was named South Carolina Aviator of the Year in...

read more

Gerald M. Ballard

Gerald M. Ballard

2004   “Since Gerald became Breakfast Club President, more than 23 years ago, he has done a tremendous amount for the good of aviation. He has brought hundreds of people, from all walks of life, together every two weeks for one common passion—aviation.” Bill Hawkins Anne Gerald Michael Ballard was born September 30, 1939 in Fredericksburg, Va. His first job was at Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg in 1949 for Sidney L. Shannon. At age 10, he pumped gas into airplanes and performed general clean-up duties. Ballard moved to Augusta with his family in 1951. After high school graduation, Ballard enlisted in the U.S. Air Force as an Aircraft Mechanic, and spent 12 weeks at Lackland AFB, Texas for basic training. He then went to Amarillo for Aircraft Mechanic Tech School for six months. After graduating, he said, “I got the worst air force base assignment –Wheeless Air Force Base in Tripoli, Libya for two years. At Wheeless, he was a Crew Chief on F100s. His plane was a 55271 lF100C. His crew towed darts three miles behind the aircraft in the desert so F101s and F102s from Europe could use the darts for target practice. After 730 days in Libya, he was stationed at Moody AFB in Valdosta, Ga. until he was honorably discharged in 1964. At Moody AFB, he was Crew Chief on several aircraft, T-28s, T-33s, T-41s and T-38 Trainers. Ballard began flying a Cessna 170B in 1966 (which he still owns) and went to his first Breakfast Club in 1968. Ballard was elected president of the Breakfast Club in November 1979 and has held the office for the last 23 years. He moved to Graniteville in 1986 and built a hangar and home at SC 17 (Twin Lakes) just outside...

read more

Jack Barry

Jack Barry

2004 John F. “Jack” Barry, a native of Spartanburg, learned to fly in 1940 in the Civilian Pilot Training Program at Palmetto Air School in Spartanburg. At the time, he was a student at Wofford College and worked part time as a flight instructor. During World War II, Barry served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a Service Pilot, Check Pilot and Flight Instructor with the North African Division Air Transport Command First Pilot School. He was an aircraft commander and First Pilot on the North African, Middle East ATC routes and in the New York, New England areas in C47 and C46 aircraft. After graduating from Wofford College, the University of South Carolina, and following a career in education, Barry joined the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission in 1957. He began as a flight inspector in charge of aircraft registration, accident investigation and pilot registration. He was named director of Aviation Education in 1958 and assistant director of the agency in 1959. Barry served as Assistant/Deputy Director of the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission for 20 years, retiring in 1979. In 1980, Barry received the Civil Air Patrol’s Brewer Award. The Federal Aviation Administration honored Barry in 1979 with the Flight Safety Award in recognition of outstanding support of flight safety program activities in the general aviation community. During his career, Barry was an instructor on AOPA flight training programs from 1962 until his retirement. He received a meritorious award from AOPA in 1965. Barry also served on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Flight Instructors. Additional contributions to aeronautics in South Carolina included writing the monthly Aviation Newsletter for 21 years, planning and directing Pilot Refresher programs on the South Carolina Educational Television network, and conducting pilot clinics and an annual Agricultural Pilot School. Barry held an Airline Transport Rating and a commercial helicopter rating. He held instructor ratings for airplane, rotocraft, instrument and advanced ground school. He was also an Army Instrument Flight Examiner, 3rd U.S. Army Instrument Examining Board. Barry amassed more than 8,000 hours during his flying career, including 4,505 in multiengine aircraft. He loved to fly and it...

read more

Randolph Battle

Randolph Battle

2007 Randolph Battle’s lifelong affection for airplanes began early, when he was just a teen. He was recruited for pilot training at the end of World War II by the Army Air Corps, but his actual duty was as an aircraft mechanic in the Philippines. As part of a maintenance squadron, he flew Piper Cubs and Stinson Voyagers. After the war, he returned to Nichols and officially earned his pilot’s license. Unfortunately, he had the same complaint that was common among a number of pilots in his hometown–the town had no airfield. However, he, his brother Frank, friend and fellow pilot Euel Shelley and a few other fliers solved the problem. They carved out an 1,800-foot strip on the edge of the little town of 300 people, nestled between the swamps of the Lumber and Little Pee Dee rivers, about 40 miles inland from Myrtle Beach. Their short and narrow North-South strip marked the beginning of real aviation in the area. A longer and wider East-West runway was added shortly after. In 1949, Battle organized a Civil Air Patrol Squadron in Nichols. He commanded the squadron and eventually worked his way through the ranks to South Carolina Wing Commander. He later became an advisor to the CAP regional commander. Battle credits his father, J.R. Battle, with fostering his interest in aviation, stating that his father took him to the air show in Florence. When Battle returned from the war, it was also his father who volunteered to pay for his formal flight training. In the 1950s, Battle became the designated pilot for the family businesses–a petroleum supply firm, a farm supply operation, a hardware store and a supermarket. They also developed extensive farm holdings, including tobacco land. He earned his multi-engine rating, instrument rating and commercial license. When other members of his family wanted to learn to fly, Battle earned his instructor’s license. He taught a number of people who each received private licenses, including his son and a nephew. He then added an instrument instructor’s license. The Battle family was involved in the construction of the lighted, 4,500-foot, asphalt-paved regional airport at Marion in 1974, and the Battles have played a continuing role in the area’s development. He was also active in business and economic development, with a strong belief that the Marion County airport should be a means to promote growth in the county. “Aviation and industry go hand in hand,” he...

read more

Frank Bedard

Frank Bedard

2002 “…technician, teacher, mentor, and man who would give you the shirt off his back!” Frank Bedard began his career in 1949, working at the Cleveland, Ohio Airport. He soon joined the U.S. Air Force as a mechanic, where he was recognized for his contribution to safety in the development of testing procedures for aircraft ignition systems. After leaving the military, Bedard attended Spartan School of Aeronautics where he received his “A&E” under the old Civil Aviation Agency. After working for the airlines for several years. Frank Bedard landed a job in 1957 at the Charleston Airport. For more than 50 years, he has worked in the same hangar, serving the needs of South Carolina aviation. Over the years, the business ownership changed more than once, but Bedard remained, serving as a licensed mechanic with inspection privileges, director of maintenance for air taxi programs, as director of quality assurance for several repair stations and, as a manager. Bedard was awarded the FAA’s Charles Taylor Master Mechanic’s Award in February 2002. He is one of only three South Carolinians ever to receive that prestigious...

read more

General Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

General Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

1996 Born in Columbia, Charles Bolden Jr. earned a bachelor’s degree from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1968 and a master’s degree in systems management from the University of Southern California in 1977. After graduation from the Naval Academy, he accepted a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. He completed flight training and was designated a naval aviator in May 1970. While assigned to VMA (AW)-533 at Nam Phong, Thailand from June 1972 to June 1973, he flew more than 100 missions into North and South Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia in the A-6A Intruder. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, MD in June 1979 and was assigned to the Naval Air Test Center. Bolden served as ordnance test pilot and flew test projects in the A-6E, EA-6B and A-7C/E aircraft. He has logged more than 6,000 hours of flying time. Selected by NASA in 1980, he became an astronaut in 1981 and has flown four space shuttle missions: the Columbia in 1986, Discovery in 1990, Atlantis in 1992 and Discovery in 1994. Bolden has logged more than 680 hours in space. Bolden has earned numerous awards, including the Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Defense Meritorious Service, Air Medal, Strike/Flight Medal (8th award), NASA Outstanding leadership Medal, three NASA Exceptional Service Medals and the 1996 South Carolina Aviator of the Year. Biographical Data [NASA Logo] National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Houston, Texas 77058 NAME: Charles F. Bolden, Jr. (Brig. General, USMC)portrait of Charles Bolden NASA Astronaut (former) PERSONAL DATA: Born August 19, 1946, in Columbia, South Carolina. Married to the former Alexis (Jackie) Walker of Columbia, South Carolina. They have two children. He enjoys racquetball, running and soccer His mother, Mrs. Ethel M. Bolden, resides in Columbia. EDUCATION: Graduated from C. A. Johnson High School in Columbia, South Carolina, in 1964; received a bachelor of science degree in electrical science from the United States Naval Academy in 1968, and a master of science in systems management from the University of Southern California in 1977. ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the Montford Point Marine Association, the United States Naval Institute, and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. Lifetime member of the Naval Academy Alumni Association, the University of Southern California General Alumni Association. SPECIAL HONORS: Recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Air Medal, the Strike/Flight Medal (8th award), Honorary Doctor of Science Degree from the University of South Carolina (1984), Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Winthrop College (1986), the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal (1992), NASA Exceptional Service Medals (1988, 1989, 1991), the University of Southern California Alumni Award of Merit (1989), and an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Johnson C. Smith University (1990). EXPERIENCE: Bolden accepted a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps following graduation from the United States Naval Academy in 1968. He underwent flight training at Pensacola, Florida, Meridian, Mississippi, and Kingsville, Texas, before being designated a naval aviator in May 1970. He flew more than 100 sorties into North and South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, in the A-6A Intruder while assigned to VMA(AW)-533 at Nam Phong, Thailand, June 1972 to June 1973. Upon returning to the United States, Bolden began...

read more

Major General Jones E. Bolt

Major General Jones E. Bolt

2008 Major General Jones E. Bolt was born in Ware Shoals in 1921. He graduated from high school at Williamston and earned an engineering degree from Clemson University in 1942. He also earned a reserve commission as second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. In August 1942, he entered active military duty, receiving flying training in Orangeburg, as well as Macon and Moultrie, Ga. He completed advanced flying training in March 1943 and was assigned as a T-6 and P-40 aircraft pilot instructor in advanced flying school at Spence Field, Ga. In March 1944, he was transferred to Florida for P-47 combat training. Bolt flew 15 combat missions in April 1944 with the 362nd Fighter Bomber Group in the European Theater of Operations before he was forced to bail out of his airplane because of engine failure. He landed in a German Command Post just outside of Paris France and was taken prisoner. General Bolt was sent to Stalagluft 3, a prisoner of war camp near Sagan, Germany and was one of the prisoners of war on the infamous march from Stalagluft 3 to Stalagluft 7A at Mooseburg during January and February 1945. He was liberated from the prisoner of war camp in April 1945. He returned to the United States in 1945, and he attended Aircraft Engineering School at Chanute Field, Ill. In June 1946, he was assigned as flight test maintenance officer for F-80 aircraft at Williams Field, Az and was later assigned as deputy commander for maintenance, Maintenance and Supply Group. In 1948, he assisted in the formation of and flew right wing on the first Air Force jet aerobatic team, The Aerojets, until August 1950. At that time, the team was halted because of the Korean War. When reactivated in 1952, the team was renamed the Thunderbirds. In August 1950, he was transferred to the 86th Fighter Wing in Munich, Germany and served as commander of the 526th Fighter Bomber Squadron. In November 1953, he returned to the U.S. and attended the Air Command and Staff College at Maxwell Air Force Base. After graduation, he was transferred to the War Plans Division of the U.S. Air Force in Washington DC, where he was involved in Air Force commitments and deployments to NATO and correlating war plans associated with these forces. His last year there, he was a member of the Force Structure Committee that involved future plans for the U.S. Air Force. In July 1958, General Bolt was assigned as commander of the 53rd Fighter Interceptor Group, Sioux City, Iowa, and in October 1959, he became commander of the 328th Fighter Wing, Aerospace Defense Command, at Richards-Gebaur Air Force Base, Mo. He was assigned to the 18th Tactical Fighter Wing on Oinawa as deputy commander in July 1961. In February 1963, after completing F-105 aircraft operational training at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., General Bolt planned and led the first nonstop flight of Thunderchiefs from Hickman Air Force Base, Hawaii, to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, via Wake and Guam. This marked the first time a single engine fighter had flown such long distances over water. In May 1964, he became commander of the 18th Tactical Fighter...

read more

Robert Edmiston ” Bob” Bryant

Robert Edmiston ” Bob” Bryant

1993 In 1959, Robert Bryant was a founding member of The Rock Hill Airport Commission, and he worked tirelessly to establish the airport that now bears his name. He served on that commission until his death in 1977. Bryant was awarded two international aviation records from the Federation Aeronautique Internationale representing flight in an Aeronca C3. The first record was in 1936, when he flew non-stop from Rock Hill to Miami in an airplane weighing less than 600 pounds. His second record-breaking flight in 1938 was from Miami to Camden, NJ in 13 hours, 20 minutes, using 40 gallons of fuel. Bryant learned to fly by trading motorcycle lessons with Col. Elliott White Springs, a WWI Flying Ace who is also in the Aviation Hall of Fame. August 16, 1932. Bob Bryant in front of a BACO Biplane, Fort Mill, SC. The aircraft had a ten-cylinder Anzani engine and was owned by Col. Elliot White Springs. Bob made his first flight (probably in a JN) in 1919 and took his first flying lesson in this BACO in 1921 trading flying lesson for motorcycle instruction with Col. Springs. Photo: Page Winchester, Monroe, NC The day after this photo was taken, Col. Springs flew a Tomas-Morse Scout under the Buster Boyd Bridge on the Catawba River, near Ft. Mill. The movie camera in front of Bob was used by PATHE News to film the event. (See Col. Springs page for more...

read more

Raymond Butters

Raymond Butters

2006 Ray Butters’ experience in aviation, which began when he was a 12-year-old in Detroit, spans 75 years. Butters retired from the U.S. Air Force after 20 years, holding all ranks from “Buck” private in the Army Air Corps to U.S. Air Force Major. He served as a combat pilot in WWII, Korea and with the French in Vietnam. Butters received the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Good Conduct Medal, five Air Medals and several others. Upon retirement, Butters worked for the FAA as an air carrier inspector involved in the certification of personnel and aircraft. He held an Airline Transport Pilot License as well as Flight Engineer, Navigator, Dispatcher, Hot Air Balloon and Sea Plane ratings. His foreign licenses are French, German, Iranian, Korean, and Thai, to name a few. Once he retired from the FAA, Butters moved to France with Airbus Industries and was named deputy flight crew training manager on the Concord, Airbus and Corvette. After seven years, Butters returned to the U.S. with Flight Safety International and trained Lear and Citation aircraft crews. He then served as an aviation consultant and executive vice president for Foxjet Aviation. In 1995, he moved to South Carolina and became involved with aviation in Lee County, serving as chairman of the Lee County Airport Commission and working with the Young Eagle Program in association with the Experimental Aircraft Association. As airport commissioner, Butters is credited with making renovations at Lee County Airport a reality. He secured more than $750,000 for the airport and set in motion a five-year Capitol Improvement Program to include airfield lighting, security fencing, a weather system, maintenance/administration building and a paved parking ramp. Plans also include construction of a Fixed Base Operations building, providing a place for passengers, the public and pilots to be afforded tradition airport services. Lee County received a $560,000 federal grant, and other grants and funding have been secured by Butters, said County Councilman Ron Fountain. When the construction bids were received, the low bid opened at $200,000 more than what was available. Butters went to the FAA and was able to secure the rest of the money, said County Councilman Gordon Eckley. The single efforts of Airport Commissioner Ray Butters, who worked tirelessly, willingly and feverishly to obtain funding, resolve environmental concerns, and assist the engineer, consultants and the construction company, are commendable. The citizens of Lee County recognized his hard work and named the airport Butters Field in his honor. He has brought aviation to the forefront through sponsorship of Young Eagles youth flight programs and the 3rd Annual Ultra-Light Aircraft Fall...

read more