SCAA News Feed


Visit often to learn about the latest news and events from SCAA. The SCAA is dedicated to promoting aviation in South Carolina. If you know of an event or special press release that is important to aviation in South Carolina please contact our office so we can post it here. Thank you for supporting SCAA.


Spread the word -now accepting applications for flight training scholarships

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in News Feed |

Spread the word -now accepting applications for flight training scholarships

View Online Version Here. Forward this email to someone who’s passionate about pursuing a pilot’s certificate Dear Christopher, AOPA is making it easier for prospective pilots of all ages to achieve their aviation dreams! Applications are now open for both the You Can Fly High School and the AOPA Foundation Flight Training Scholarship programs that will award over $150,000 in financial assistance for direct flight training expenses. Click to learn more. The You Can Fly High School Scholarship program will award twenty $5,000 scholarships to deserving high school students, aged 15-18. The AOPA Foundation Flight Training Scholarship program offers multiple scholarships ranging from $2,500 to $5,000 and is available to those holding a current FAA Student Pilot Certificate and are at least age 16 by May 31st Applicants for both programs must be a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident. LEARN MORE  Application Deadlines: You Can Fly High School Flight Training Scholarships:  May 19, 2017  AOPA Foundation Flight Training Scholarships: May 31, 2017 Be sure to forward this email to a prospective pilot today! Our flight training scholarships are made possible through donations to the AOPA Foundation. © Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association 421 Aviation Way Frederick, MD 21701 (800) 872-2672 (301) 695-2375...

read more

Three Historic WWII Airplane to Visit Greenville

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in News Feed |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   Three Historic WWII Airplanes to Visit Greenville B-25 Mitchell bomber, P-51 Mustang and SBD dive bomber will offer rides   GREENVILLE, S.C. (March 16, 2017) – Three iconic World War II aircraft will bring history alive May 5 -7 at the Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU), Airport Rd Ext., Greenville, S.C.  The Minnesota Wing and the Dixie Wing of the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) will bring a B-25, “Miss Mitchell”; a P-51, “Red Nose”; and an SBD-5 Dauntless dive bomber for the enjoyment of aviation fans in the Greenville area. The trio of beautifully restored WWII warbirds will be at the Runway Cafe ramp and the CAF will offer once-in-a lifetime rides in all three aircraft.   “It has been many years since the Commemorative Air Force has brought aircraft to the Greenville Downtown Airport,” said Joe Frasher, GMU’s Airport Director. “We are thrilled that they are coming back. People will not want to miss seeing these World War II aircraft.  In the past, when people have heard of these types of visits after the fact, they were sad that they missed seeing them in person.”   “It is an honor for us to visit Greenville with these great warbirds,” said Jay Bess, Dixie Wing Leader. “We look forward to welcoming veterans and Greenville area residents. This is part of a five-stop tour to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Raid over Japan, and it is a rare opportunity for people to ride in three historic WWII aircraft.”   To book rides and for more information click HERE. Media Kit click HERE   About the B-25 The North American B-25 Mitchell is an American twin-engine, medium bomber manufactured by North American Aviation (NAA). It was named in honor of Major General William “Billy” Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation.   The B-25B first gained fame as the bomber used in the April 18,1942, Doolittle Raid, in which 16 B-25Bs led by Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle attacked mainland Japan, four months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The mission gave a much-needed lift in spirits to the Americans. Although the actual damage was relatively minor, it forced the Japanese to divert troops for home defense for the remainder of the war. Used by many Allied air forces, the B-25 served in every theater of World War II. After the war ended, many remained in service, operating across four decades. Nearly 10,000 Mitchells rolled from NAA factories.   The Minnesota Wing’s B-25 is painted to represent the B-25J “Miss Mitchell”, which served in the 310th Bomb Group, 57th Bomb Wing of the 12th Air Force in North Africa and Italy, completing more than 130 missions. Its legacy of no crew fatalities during all of its missions was a rare accomplishment. This airplane has never seen combat. After a 12-year restoration by the Minnesota Wing of the CAF, Miss Mitchell took her first flight on April 18, 1992 — exactly 50 years after the day of the daring Doolittle raid.   About the SBD The Northrop Corporation developed the SBD before World War II. It was first flown in July 1935, but was considered obsolete by December 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Douglas Aircraft purchased the SBD contract and the SBD-1 was first delivered in...

read more

Atlanta’s airport employs drones to monitor runway conditions

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in News Feed |

Atlanta’s airport employs drones to monitor runway conditions

ATLANTA (CBS46) – The airspace above the world’s busiest airport just got a little busier. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is now using drones to survey and document runway pavement for future maintenance. In an effort to obtain the most accurate surveys of ATL areas set to undergo changes in the ongoing $6 billion ATLNext construction project, Hartsfield-Jackson officials — along with a survey contractor — applied for and received an FAA waiver allowing for drone flights above the airspace. This is the airport’s second time using drones. A January flight was the first such flight of an unmanned vehicle in airspace over ATL. The drones captured data and imagery of the ATL garages scheduled for reconstruction. The operation was so successful, plans are underway for additional drone flights. Hartsfield-Jackson serves more than 101 million passengers annually with nonstop service to more than 150 U.S. destinations and nearly 70 international destinations in more than 45 countries. ATL boasts a direct economic impact of $34.8 billion in metro Atlanta and a total direct economic impact of $70.9 billion in Georgia. The Airport is the largest employer in Georgia, with more than 63,000 employees. Copyright 2017 WGCL-TV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved. Read...

read more

Fact Sheet – FAA Forecast–Fiscals Years 2016-37

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in News Feed |

Fact Sheet – FAA Forecast–Fiscals Years 2016-37

Fact Sheet – FAA Forecast–Fiscals Years 2016-37 For Immediate Release March 21, 2017 Contact: Hank Price Phone: 202-267-3883 I. 2016 SUMMARY:  ECONOMIC ACTIVITY AND AIR TRAVEL U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased 1.6 percent; world GDP increased 2.3 percent. Domestic mainline yields decreased 5.6 percent, while international yields decreased 9.1 percent in 2016. In real terms (adjusted for inflation in FY16$), domestic yields decreased 6.5 percent and international yields decreased 9.9 percent. Domestic enplanements on mainline and regional air carriers increased from 696.3M in 2015 to 726.2M (4.3 percent) in 2016.  Domestic mainline carrier enplanements increased 5.8 percent, while domestic regional carrier enplanements decreased 0.9 percent. International enplanements on mainline and regional air carriers increased from 90.2M in 2015 to 93.4M (3.6percent) in 2016.  Mainline carrier international enplanements were up 3.1 percent, while regional carrier international enplanements increased 16.0 percent. Domestic RPMs by mainline and regional air carriers increased from 628.5B in 2015 to 663.2B (5.5 percent) in 2016. Domestic mainline carrier RPMs increased 6.1 percent and domestic regional carrier RPMs increased 0.3 percent. International RPMs by US carriers increased from 261.0B in 2015 to 264.8B (1.5 percent) in 2016. Total system RPMs increased from 889.5B in 2015 to 928.0B (4.3 percent) in 2016. Total mainline carrier RPMs increased by 4.6 percent while total regional carrier RPMs increased by 0.9 percent. U.S. commercial air carriers (including passenger and cargo) reported an operating profit of $29.6B in 2016, compared to an operating profit of $26.7B in 2015. Operating revenues decreased 0.1 percent in 2016, while operating expenses decreased 1.7 percent. In 2016 total landings and takeoffs at combined FAA and contract towers were up 0.5 percent from 2015. Air carrier activity increased by 4.8 percent, while commuter/air taxi activity decreased by 4.0 percent. General aviation activity dropped 0.2 percent, while military aircraft activity dropped 1.3 percent. II. ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS FOR FAA FORECASTS U.S. Real GDP is forecast to increase from $16.6T in 2016 to $25.4T in 2037, an average annual rate of 2.1 percent.  World GDP is forecast to grow at a faster pace of 2.8 percent over the same 21-year period, from $76.7T to $137.1T. GDP by World Region (Average Annual Percent Growth) World Region Fiscal Year Calendar Year 2016 2017 2018 2017-37 2016 2016 2018 2017-37 U.S 1.6 2.1 2.5 2.0 1.6 2.3 2.6 2.1 World N/A N/A N/A N/A 2.3 2.7 3.0 2.8 Canada N/A N/A N/A N/A 1.3 2.1 2.4 2.0 Europe/Afr/ME N/A N/A N/A N/A 1.7 1.7 2.0 2.1 Latin America N/A N/A N/A N/A (1.1) 1.2 2.3 3.1 Asia/Pacific N/A N/A N/A N/A 4.3 4.3 4.4 3.9 Inflation is projected to increase 2.4 percent in 2017 and remain moderate over the remaining 20 years of the forecast period, averaging 2.5 percent annually. III. AVIATION ACTIVITY FORECASTS Mainline Air Carrier and Regionals Total mainline air carrier and regional RPMs are forecast to increase from 928.0B in 2016 to 1.53T in 2037, an average annual rate of 2.4 percent. Domestic RPMs are projected to increase 3.2 percent in 2017 and then grow an average of 2.0 percent per year during the remaining 20-year forecast period.  International RPMs are forecast to increase 1.9 percent in 2017 and then grow an average of 3.4 percent per year for the rest of the forecast period. Total mainline air carrier and regional...

read more

Lockheed Martin will move production of F-16 fighter jets to Greenville

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in News Feed |

Lockheed Martin will move production of F-16 fighter jets to Greenville

Wednesday, March 22nd 2017, 1:23 pm EDT Wednesday, March 22nd 2017, 2:01 pm EDT By Dal Kalsi   GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) – Lockheed Martin said it is moving the production line for F-16 fighter jets from Texas to Greenville. Lockheed has had a presence in Greenville for more than three decades and has a manufacturing facility near Donaldson Center. Officials for the aerospace company said the last F-16 to be produced in Ft. Worth will roll off the line in September and then all equipment and tools will be moved to Greenville over a 2-year period. Meanwhile, the Ft. Worth facility will be expanded to produce S-35 jets. Leslie Farmer, a spokesperson for Lockheed Martin, said Greenville’s experienced workforce and South Carolina being a right to work state led to the decision to move production to Greenville. Farmer said the Greenville plant also has the facilities and infrastructure to support the F-16 operation and will only require an upfit to meet the f-16 requirements. Lockheed Martin currently employs 500 employees in Greenville. The Greenville operation currently provides maintenance and modification on existing jets, such as the P-3 Orion, C-130 Hercules and C-5M Galaxy. The Greenville site is also home Lockheed’s to the Final Assembly and Checkout facility for the T-50A  in the U.S. Air Force’s Advanced Pilot Training competition. Farmer said moving the F-16 production lines to Greenville would create an additional 200 to 250...

read more

Sad News to Report, Howell (Nick) Jones, Jr. passed away

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in News Feed |

Sad News to Report, Howell (Nick) Jones, Jr. passed away

In Memory of SCAA Hall of Famer, Nick Jones June 19, 1927 – March 11, 2017   A native of Orangeburg, Howell C. “Nick” Jones served the military in the World War II Training Command as an Army Air Corps Aviation Cadet at Auburn University and in the navy as an Aviation Cadet. In 1964, Jones began construction of a Cassutt race plane, which he finished in less than 15 months. In 1955, he flew his first air race and for 11 years he was involved in Formula One racing. After the first “straight” Cassutt, he built two other modified versions of the same plane. A leader in the sport himself, he was the founder, promoter and organizer of the Oshkosh 500, an efficiency acclaimed as the “the race at which it’s impossible to cheat.” Jones’ strong interest in designing aircraft resulted in the creation of the White Lighting, a four-seat aircraft that set three world speed records. Jones continues his involvement with the design, manufacturing and sale of highly advanced, two-stroke engines for aircraft, boats, cars and industrial machinery. In 1998, he was named South Carolina Aviator of the...

read more

Registration is now OPEN for the SC Aerospace Conference & Expo

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in Aviation Week, News Feed |

Registration is now OPEN for the SC Aerospace Conference & Expo

Registration is now OPEN for  SC Aerospace Conference & Expo August 29 – 31, 2017 Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center southcarolinaerospaceconference.com   Sponsors opportunities are available now! For details, visit the conference new website.    Website:  http://southcarolinaaerospaceconference.com/ Twitter:  @scaeroconf Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/scaerospaceconference On LinkedIn, we will continue to use the SC Aerospace page:  https://www.linkedin.com/company/sc-aerospace This conference connects industry, academia and government to showcase the rapidly growing aerospace cluster in South Carolina. Featuring: Aerospace Industry Leaders • Networking Opportunities • Talent Development • Aerospace Education • ACE ’17 Technical Symposium • Aerospace Industry Exhibitions.  ...

read more

SCAA Palmetto Aviation – Deadline for Articles – March 20

Posted by on Feb 28, 2017 in Member Update, Newsletter |

SCAA Palmetto Aviation – Deadline for Articles – March 20

SCAA is starting to work on the next edition of the Palmetto Aviation (Spring Edition), please submit your newsletter articles by March 20th.   To submit an article, email Hannah Lorance at scaa@scaaonline.com To read past editions, please see the SCAA newsletter library at this link  – https://scaaonline.com/palmetto-aviation/....

read more

SC Aerospace Conference & Expo – Save the Date

Posted by on Feb 28, 2017 in Aviation Week, Member Update, News Feed |

SC Aerospace Conference & Expo – Save the Date

SC Aerospace Conference & Expo August 29 – 31, 2017 Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center southcarolinaerospaceconference.com This conference connects industry, academia and government to showcase the rapidly growing aerospace cluster in South Carolina. Featuring: Aerospace Industry Leaders • Networking Opportunities • Talent Development • Aerospace Education • ACE ’17 Technical Symposium • Aerospace Industry Exhibitions. Registration opens in March!  Sponsors opportunities are available now! For details, visit the conference new website (link above).  ...

read more

Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Walk at Greenville Downtown Airport

Posted by on Feb 28, 2017 in Member Update |

Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Walk at Greenville Downtown Airport

On Saturday,March 18th (rain date March 25th), volunteers will gather at 7:15 a.m​. ​at the Greenville Downtown Airport Terminal lobby (100 Tower Drive, Greenville, SC 29607) for a Foreign Object Debris (FOD) walk. Why?  Because “FOD is responsible for a significant amount of aircraft damage each year and is a threat to aircraft safety.  It can damage tires, engines, wind screens and airframes.  The Concorde crash in Paris in 2000 was due to FOD'” stated Keat Pruszenski, a local upstate aviation enthusiast, who is organizing this event. “I was told by a friend who works at an airline that they have to replace 4-5 wind screens (aircraft windshields) every week due to FOD blown on them from jet blasts.  There have been many studies that show the cost for FOD due to damage to aircraft every year is in the Millions of Dollars,” added Pruszenski. What is FOD?  It is anything that should not be on the airport surfaces where aircraft have movement.  Common items are things that can fall off of people or out of shirt pockets like badges, hats, pens, pencils, cell phones, and pocket lights.  Some items come off of aircraft or vehicles moving in the area like tire valve caps, aircraft lens lights, screws, nuts and bolts.  Other items are naturally occurring like sticks, acorns, rocks and pavement particles that have come loose from the surface.  Many other things have been found like golf balls, socks, drill bits, water bottles, rubber bands, duct tape and wire. The process involves a team of volunteer FOD inspectors walking in lines, spaced about 10 feet apart, to find and pick-up any foreign objects that might cause damage to aircraft.  Items are secured in individual bags during the walk, then consolidated, counted and a FOD index of pieces per 1,000 square meters of area inspected is determined.  The index can be compared to the score of other airports and to a later survey to determine the success of the airport in controlling possible FOD on a regular basis.  FOD is so important to most military airports that they conduct a FOD walk every day to prevent unserviceable aircraft. “FOD is everyone’s responsibility on a daily basis at an airport.  Airport employees, tenants and pilots dispose of FOD all day long.  We also have a street sweeper that we use to collect FOD.  If you see it, you pick it up.  That is the rule,” stated Joe Frasher, Airport Director at GMU. “A FOD walk determines how well we are doing and where improvement may be needed,”  added Frasher. Please join us at 7:15 a.m. on Saturday, March 18th (rain date March 25th) at the Greenville Downtown Airport Terminal lobby to start a FOD walk at 7:30 a.m.  We will walk all runways, taxiways and aprons and finish with donuts and coffee in the Terminal lobby.  We expect to be finished with the walk by​ 9​:00 a.m.  PLEASE BRING A FLASHLIGHT.  We will have bags. “We need your help to continue to make GMU the safest airport that we can,” stated Frasher.  Please email Keat Pruszenski at mississippiwildcat@excite.com and tell him if you can make it. About GMU GMU is the busiest general aviation airport and third busiest airport overall in South Carolina and is a self-sufficient entity with financial strength that doesn’t rely on local taxpayers for funding. GMU is home to Greenville Jet Center, the largest Fixed Base Operator (FBO) in S.C., as well...

read more