The 2018 Summer Edition of the SCAA Palmetto Aviation Newsletter has arrived. 

The 2018 Summer Edition of the SCAA Palmetto Aviation Newsletter has arrived.  Welcome to your digital edition of the Palmetto Aviation! Click here or the image below to read your latest...
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SCAA Safety Seminar scheduled for Sunday, September 16 HAS BEEN CANCELLED 

Due to the impending Hurricane and out of our desire to encourage safety above all else . . . the SCAA is cancelling its Safety Seminar that was scheduled for Sunday, September 16 at the Hunter-Gatherer, Curtiss-Wright Hangar following the SC Breakfast Club. PLEASE be safe.
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Spartanburg Pilots Association Ground School – Aug. 30

Spartanburg Pilots Association Ground School The FAA Pilot Knowledge Test Preparation Class   August 30th thru November 8th Every Thursday evening from 6.00 pm to 8.30 pm. Spartanburg Airport bottom conference room   Schedule: Week 1. Airplanes and Aerodynamics Week 2. Airplane Instruments, Engines, and Systems Week 3. Airports, Air Traffic Control, and Airspace Week 4. Federal Aviation Regulations Week 5. Airplane Performance and Weight and Balance Week 6. Aeromedical Factors and Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM) Week 7. Aviation Weather Week 8. Aviation Weather Services Week 9. Navigation: Charts and Publications Week 10. Navigation Systems Week 11. Cross-Country Flight Planning   The class is open to everybody who has an interest in aviation. It provides an opportunity to experience what it takes to become a pilot. The class is currently has a very diverse group that you would not normally find in a class like this.   You must be a member of the Spartanburg Pilots Association You can join during the first class if you are not a current member. Please register with Terry Connorton if you plan to attend. Seats are limited. Terry_Connorton@hotmail.com...
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Committees Meetings for August 23rd have been cancelled!

Due to the increased volume of events for aviation week, we have decided to cancel the committees meetings for August 23rd. Instead, we would like to invite you to attend an aviation week event happening near you. We intend to reschedule these meetings at a later date, possibly sometime in September. Keep you posted!
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Spartanburg Downtown Memorial Airport in Business View Magazine

  Click the link below –  See pages 302-309 for more details:...
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RUNWAY IMPROVEMENTS AT HILTON HEAD AIRPORT ENHANCE SAFETY, SERVICE OPTIONS & STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

    Author: Ken Wysocky Published in: May-June 2018 A $14.1 million runway extension project at Hilton Head Island Airport (HHH) will enhance safety and allow the South Carolina airfield to accommodate larger aircraft. At the same time, the project also offers a practical blueprint for how to address local sentiment that runs counter to FAA recommendations. The project, expected to end in late June, adds 700 feet to HHH’s only runway (403 feet on one end and 297 on the other end), extending it to 5,000 feet. The additional length enabled American Airlines—the airport’s only commercial carrier—to replace its Dash 8 turboprop service with regional jet service via 76-passenger Embraer 175s. That provides residents and tourists with more travel options, says Jon Rembold, airport director for HHH and nearby Beaufort County Airport. “In addition, we now can receive private aircraft from airports that are farther away than before, because the longer runway allows them to carry more fuel and people on board. It opens up their range,” Rembold points out. The new length also makes HHH more competitive with Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport, located about 45 miles southwest, and Charleston International Airport, located about 100 miles northeast, both which have runways more than 9,000 feet long, he adds. facts&figures Project: Runway Improvements Location: Hilton Head Island (SC) Airport 2017 Enplanements/Deplanements: 27,332/30,553 Key Components: 700-foot runway extension; stormwater detention system; 2 engineered material arresting systems Runway Extension: $14.1 million Stormwater System: $5.4 million Arresting Beds: $8 million Funding: 90% FAA; 5% state; 5% airport revenue Engineering Consultant: Talbert, Bright & Ellington Engineering: Ward Edwards Engineering Prime Contractor: Quality Enterprises USA Stormwater Chambers: CULTEC Key Benefits: Improved safety; ability to accommodate larger aircraft/provide more travel options to passengers; enhanced stormwater management & wildlife mitigation Along with the runway extension, the airport installed a new $5.4 million stormwater management system that stores, treats and transports rainwater downstream via a system of large underground plastic chambers. Stormwater management is critical because HHH sits amid an 81,000-acre environmentally sensitive watershed that includes the Calibogue Sound, three rivers and their tributaries, creeks, lakes and tidal flats. As such, the area is home to wildlife such as ospreys, bald eagles and dolphins. The new system, which replaced a drainage canal adjacent to the airport’s runway, also serves as a wildlife mitigation tool, because there is no longer standing water to attract animals such as foxes,...
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SCHAF Newsletter July 2018

Click here to view SCHAF Newsletter July 2018
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Memorial Service honoring Gerald Ballard on June 23, 2018

You are cordially invited to the Memorial Service honoring Gerald Ballard, President of the South Carolina Breakfast Club (November 1979 – December 2017). The Service will be held on June 23, 2018 at Twin Lakes Airport (S17) – 132 Ballard Drive, Trenton, SC 29847. Agenda: 11:00 am – Arrival and Fellowship 12:00 pm – Lunch catered by Sconyer’s Bar-B-Que 1:00 pm – Service and Speakers 2:00 pm – Military Honor 2:15 pm – Missing Man Formation 2:30 pm- Lottery Drawing 3:00 pm – Adjourn Click the link for more details:...
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The South Carolina Flight Standard District Office – Educational Outreach to Identify Suspected Illegal Charter Flights

Unfortunately, there have been instances where unsuspecting members of the public have chartered aircraft for flights only to find out after the fact that the operators of these flights were not legally qualified, i.e., not certificated, to conduct those flights.   Unscrupulous entities have used many schemes to ostensibly legitimize the flight, i.e., illicit and/or devious lease agreements, conditional sales contracts, operational control conveyances, etc. Regrettably, many members of the public simply are not aware that an operator must possess and display either an “Operating Certificate” or “Air Carrier Certificate.”  Moreover, many members of the public have chartered a flight and unwittingly accepted the responsibilities of “operational control” when they were not aware that “operational control” involved:   1.     Flight Crewmember Selection; 2.     Manual Control; 3.     Flight Planning; 4.     Airworthiness of Aircraft; 5.     Flight Release; 6.     Flight Locating; and 7.     Flight Information   This knowing or unknowing assumption of the responsibility of operational control creates a serious problem in air safety and involves substantial legal liabilities for the unsuspecting user who has become a victim of an uncertificated operator.   Therefore, in an effort inform members of the public accordingly, SC FSDO personnel will convey the requirements of legitimate operators to possess and display their Operating Certificate or Air Transportation Certificate and that the operators are responsible for all matters concerning operational control.  SC FSDO personnel will post informational posters at FBOs throughout the District of SC (see attachment).  Any questions may be directed to the SC FSDO at (803)...
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Due to the weather the Anderson Regional Airshow has been canceled on Saturday, May 19.

Due to the weather the Anderson Regional Airshow has been canceled on Saturday, May 19. A full schedule remains in play for Sunday, May 20. Gates open at 10 a.m., and the show is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m.  ...
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New Advisory standardizes non-towered flight operations

MAY 7, 2018 BY GENERAL AVIATION NEWS STAFF A new Advisory Circular standardizes traffic pattern altitudes and procedures at airports without operating control towers. Advisory Circular (AC) 90-66B, Non-Towered Airport Flight Operations, replaces two advisories: One from 1993 that addressed traffic patterns, and another from 1990 that provided communication guidance, according to officials with the National Business Aviation Association. “No matter what a pilot flies – turbine, piston, parachute, glider, ultralight, lighter-than-air or unmanned aircraft system – they should read this AC, because it clearly presents the standards for operating at a non-towered airport,” said Richard Boll, a member of the NBAA Access Committee. “Not only does it guide the operation of a pilot’s particular aircraft, it gives the expectation of how pilots of other aircraft using the non-towered airport will operate.” Standardizing the traffic pattern altitude was a primary focus of the members of the FAA’s Aeronautical Charting Forum, said Boll. Noting the age of the previous guidance, he said the old standard was 800′ to 1,000′ above ground level (AGL). To eliminate that 200′ of confusion, the ACF set the standard at 1,000′ AGL, with left-hand turns, unless terrain or obstacles mandate otherwise. Large and turbine-powered airplanes should enter the traffic pattern at an altitude of 1,500′ AGL, or 500′ above the established pattern altitude. A recent change to the Aeronautical Information Manual introduced this standard, and the AC expands on it. Cessna 172 Skyhawk. (Photo courtesy Cessna) Entering the non-tower traffic pattern and self-announcing a flight’s position and the pilot’s intentions received equal detail and attention. It makes clear that airplanes terminating an instrument procedure with a straight-in approach do not have the right of way over VFR traffic in the pattern, said Boll. And when circling to land, left-hand turns are standard, unless otherwise documented. The committee’s goal was to improve safety for all by standardizing operational practices and getting everyone who uses non-towered airports on the same 18 pages of the new advisory circular, Boll said. “Everyone seems to focus on towered airport operations, but most of America’s more than 5,000 public-use airports do not have a tower, so safety depends on the pilots flying into them,” Boll said. Click here for more...
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SCHAF NEWSLETTER FOR APRIL 2018

Reminder: The next SCHAF Open House will be on Saturday, April 14th, from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm at Hangar Y-1 at Owens Field Airport. Foundation Happenings: We are sad to report that our illustrious secretary, Dave McIntosh is having medical issues, so we are filling some big shoes while he is recovering.Our prayers and concerns are with both Dave and his wife, Mary. We wish him a very speedy recovery. He is greatly missed! This month’s newsletter will look a little different. It is taking three of us to make up for one Dave! The board of directors at the South Carolina Historic Aviation Foundation met on March 17, 2018. Board members present were Ken Berry, Ron Skipper and Katherine Cuddy. SCHAF members present were Niall McLaughlin, Chris Gillam, David Moxley and John Chamberlain. At our March open house, we had several special guests. Ellen and Carl Nagy along with Tim Sinclair, relatives and friends of the Dan Rossman family, stopped by to see the work on GF2. They were visiting from Pennsylvania and shared some great stories about Dan Rossman. Also at the open house was Rev Matt Yon, son of Larry Yon. Larry was one of our founding board members who recently passed away. Matt delivered some fantastic reference material about the raising of GF2 from Lake Greenwood and the original restoration. There is some wonderful information about the beginnings of the restoration of GF2. Click here for the full...
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