Carroll Joye

2003 A Bamberg native, Carroll Joye entered the U.S. Force in 1957 and retired 22 years later as a Senior Master Sergeant. His foreign tours of duty included Germany, North Africa, Italy, Greenland, Southeast Asia-Vietnam, Thailand and Spain. Tours of duty in the United States included Georgia, South Carolina, New York, Arizona, Ohio, Illinois, Florida and New Mexico. Joye began his civilian aviation career in 1971, while on military tour of duty at Torrejon AB in Madrid, Spain. He earned his commercial and flight instructor’s rating through the tutelage of Heirs Furtick. As Orangeburg County Airport manager, his approval of the plans and tireless work on the construction of the Aviation Memorial and Pilot’s Walk also led to the creation of the Orangeburg Pilot’s Association. Having taught about 750 students to fly, issuing approximately 1,500 licenses/ratings, and logging some 16,500 hours of flight time, his name will be included in aviation lore for decades. Including his air force career time, Joye has been involved in aviation for almost 45...
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Senator Phil Leventis

2006 Senator Phil Leventis has been associated with all “things in aviation” in South Carolina and around the world from the time he was born on November 3, 1945 at the Columbia Army Air Base Hospital, which is now the Columbia Metropolitan Airport. Leventis was actually the last baby born before the hospital closed after World War II. As a teenager, he returned to the Columbia Airport numerous times to watch the airplanes take off and land. He began flying lessons at Columbia Metro in June 1965 and earned his private license in August. South Carolina Aviation Hall of Fame member Francis Miller administered his first flight test, which lasted 50 minutes. In 1967, he earned his Commercial License after a 35-minute test with Ms. Miller. Later that same year, he earned his instructor’s rating after only a 20-minute flight. He earned additional ratings, including his commercial glider rating at Chester in 1967 and a single engine seaplane rating in 1972 from the legendary Jack Brown in Florida. His first jobs in aviation were pumping gas for the old H&H Aviation at CAE during the summer as well as Holiday Aviation in Charlottesville, Va. during the school year in the late ‘60s. After earning his instructor rating in 1967, he taught in Charlottesville during the school year and at a Civil Air Patrol camp at the Reno/Stead Airport in Nevada during the summer of 1968. He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1969 with a Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering and earned a commission in the US Air Force as a Second Lieutenant. He began Under Graduate Pilot Training in the Air Force in July 1969, the week man first walk on the moon. Many years later, he would meet South Carolina’s “moon man,” General Charles Dukes. Upon completion of pilot training, Phil became an instructor in advance jets, T-38, and taught both USAF and German AF students at Shepard AFB, Texas. In 1974, he left active duty and entered the South Carolina Air National Guard, rising to the rank of Brigadier General and serving as commander when he retired in 1999. He continued to fly civilian aircrafts, earning his multi-engine and civilian instrument ratings in the early ‘70s. He purchased his first of 11 airplanes in 1972. It was a 1959 Cessna 182. Subsequently, he has owned and operated a 1963 Mooney M20C, a 1966PA-30Twin Comanche, a 1969,...
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Elliot Huger ” Billy” Lynam, Jr.

1995 Billy Lynam’s involvement in aviation spans more than five decades. He soloed in 1932 and in the late 1930’s, he opened a flying school at Sumter Airport. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a commissioned officer and instructor pilot. After the war, he reopened the Sumter County Airport; serving as its operator until 1976 and as manager until 1981. Lynam served as FAA Pilot Examiner and Accident Prevention counselor. He founded Sumter Airways, Inc. and Sumter Aero Applicators, Inc. A past president of the South Carolina Agriculture Aviation Association, he is also a member of the South Carolina Breakfast Club. He was in the first group of QBs in South Carolina, in the Columbia Hangar. One of South Carolina’s aviation pioneers; he has devoted most of his life to...
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Dexter C. Martin

1991 Dexter Martin began flying as a” Barn Stormer” and obtained his pilot’s license in 1919, which was signed by Orville Wright. He toured the Southeast in the famed Mabel Cody’s Flying Circus. In 1935, the South Carolina Legislature created the state Aeronautics Commission, and Martin was its first executive director. During World War II, he developed the Lexington County Airport to base a special Defense Landing Program known as Doolittle’s Raiders. He established the Palmetto School of Aeronautics for aviation mechanism and was inducted into the Aviation Pioneers Hall of Fame in 1976. The photo of Lt. Col. Dexter C. Martin was taken in 1941 as Commander of the SC Civil Air Patrol, a position held from 1941 through 1946. Link to Mabel Cody’s Flying Circus webpage Aviation in South Carolina Thanks to the Rice Creek Elementary School Dexter Martin (1897 – 1982), a barnstormer turned aeronautics commissioner, guided the development of aviation in South Carolina through several decades of its fastest growth. “Things were a lot different then. Airplanes had no instruments like today’s airplanes . . . . If you weren’t sure where you were, you landed and asked somebody.” Dexter Martin (Note: Martin did suggest painting the town’s name on the roof of a building.) Martin began flying in 1919 when he took lessons with Amelia Earhart. He came to South Carolina in the late 1920’s as a barnstormer in Mabel Cody’s Flying Circus. As Martin flew the airplane, Miss Cody, niece of Wild West showman Buffalo Bill Cody, climbed out of the plane on a rope ladder and painted “WOCO PEP” (the name of the airplane fuel maker that sponsored her) on the wing. The show visited Camden, Bennettsville, Orangeburg and many other towns. Martin earned his first pilot license in 1924. It was issued in six languages and was signed by Orville Wright. In 1935, Martin was named the first director of the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission. He helped develop many of the state’s important aviation centers, including Columbia Metropolitan Airport and Shaw, McEntire and Myrtle Beach air force bases....
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Barnie B. McEntire, Jr

1992 Barnie McEntire’s love of aviation began as a teenager when he washed Piper Cubs at Columbia’s Owens Field. After graduating from the University of South Carolina, he entered pilot training in 1939, earned his pilot’s wings in 1940 in the Army Air Corps and began a 22-year military career. He served in World War II as chief pilot for Air Transport Command’s North Atlantic Division flying B-24 bombers. In 1946, he organized the first South Carolina Air National Guard units. On February 18, 1959, he earned rank of Brigadier General. He became the first Air National Guard pilot to be proficient in flying a Mach 3 F-104 Star fighter jet in 1960. In November 1961, the Congaree Air Base was officially renamed to honor his dynamic military career as a pilot, general and patriot. McEntire Joint National Guard Station From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search McEntire Joint National Guard Station (JNGS) is affiliated with the South Carolina Air National Guard (SCANG). It is located in Eastover, South Carolina and is approximately 15 miles southeast of Columbia. McEntire JNGS is named for the late Brigadier General Barnie B. McEntire, Jr., the first commander of the SCANG and its first general officer. McEntire died in May 1961 when he rode his malfunctioning F-104 into the Susquehannah River to avoid crashing in the populated area of Harrisburg, PA. The base was previously known as Congaree Air Base and was used in World War II as a U.S. Marine Corps training base. It was re-named McEntire ANG Base in October 1961 by Governor Ernest F. Hollings. It was re-named McEntire Joint National Guard Station in 2005 to reflect the joint presence of Army and Air National Guard units. The South Carolina Air National Guard was formed in December 1946. Today 1,250 members train at McEntire JNGS. About 900 of those are traditional Guard men and women. About 300 are full-time federal employees (technicians). About 50 are state employees (some of them are also traditional Guard members). The 169th Fighter Wing is the primary unit of the SCANG. Wing units include the: 157th Fighter Squadron 169th Maintenance Squadron 169th Aircraft Generation Squadron 169th Logistics Squadron 169th Civil Engineering Squadron 169th Security Forces Squadron 169th Services Flight 169th Mission Support Flight 169th Logistics Support Flight 169th Operations Support Flight 169th Communications Squadron 169th Medical Squadron The mission of the 169th FW...
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Ronald E. McNair

1992 A native South Carolinian, Ronald McNair was graduated from Carver High School in Lake City and was a magna cum laude graduate of North Carolina A&T State. He earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he performed experiments on carbon dioxide lasers. McNair was also well known for his research on electro-optic laser modulation for satellite communications and the construction of ultra-fast infrared detectors. He was selected by NASA as astronaut candidate in 1978. He flew many NASA missions as a specialist astronaut on the Challenger Space Shuttle flight crew, including February 3, 1984, which marked the first flight of the Manned Maneuvering Unit and the first landing on a runway at Kennedy Space Center on Feb. 11, 1984. McNair lost his life on the Challenger Space Shuttle during its January 28, 1986 mission....
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George G. Miler Jr.

2002 “…a quiet-spoken man, often seen in short pants flying his Aztec around the state working on navigational aids.” “…a confident man with a positive outlook, a dreamer, who dreamed about building things.” George Miler, former president of Greenville Avionics and MilerTronics, was among the very first to use computer technology in the troubleshooting and repair of aircraft avionics and airfield navigational facilities. Miler with a MS from Florida Institute of Technology and a BS in electrical engineering from Clemson University, led the industry in the implementation of remote navigational systems monitoring for airports. A private pilot with multi-engine and instrument ratings, Miler held repairman’s certificates for radios, instruments, and specialized services, an Airframe and power plant rating, FCC General Radiotelephone Operators License, and FAA Verification of Authority to maintain non-federal navigational systems. While logging almost 4,000 hours, mostly flown in support of airport navigational systems in South Carolina, Miler also found time to participate in various professional activities. He was a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, serving as past chairman of the Piedmont section of the organization. Miler was active on several advisory committees and he participated in cooperative training for Georgia Tech and Greenville Technical College students, providing them with quality on-the-job...
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Frances Higham Miller

1991 A lifelong contributor to aviation, Miller started working for Owens Field in 1948, where she earned her pilot’s license in 1949. She obtained her Commercial and Flight Instructors’ ratings in 1950. In 1951, she became a flight instructor for Hawthorne Aviation, and she became a FAA Pilot Examiner in 1957. She administered more than 3,100 flight examinations during her 30-year tenure. In 1964, she started Miller Aviation at Columbia Metropolitan Airport, where she taught almost 6,000 people in some aspect of...
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Cyrus Robert “Buck” Moss

1993 As a child, Buck Moss made his own model airplanes, and by 1932, he had soloed in an OX-Waco 9. In 1934, he earned his aircraft mechanic certificate. An original barnstormer, he offered rides for small fees, participated in air racing, banner towing and stunt flying. In 1940, with Bevo Howard, Bob Turner and Col. Rosco Turner, he established a civilian pilot training program that eventually became the Army Air Corps training program for World War II. He served as Basic Flying and Instrument Instructor at Bush Field in Augusta and from 1945-46. He served in the U.S. Navy, receiving many military medals. In 1946, he built and operated the Fairforest Airport and Fairforest School of Aeronautics. From 1950 to 1964, he owned Palmetto Aviation, located at the Spartanburg Downtown Airport. In 1987, Moss was named Spartanburg’s Aviator of the Twentieth Century. Cyrus Robert “Buck” Moss was born October 9, 1915. At a young age, Buck became fascinated, excited and awed by airplanes, airports and flying. From early childhood he carved wings and propellers and made his own airplane. Moss started flying in 1931 and soloed in an OX-5 powered OX-Waco-9 and earned his airman’s certificate # 34152 in 1932 and his mechanic certificate # 894334 in 1934. Buck financed his flying lessons by working at Beaumont Mills and with some help from his father. Buck Moss promoted the nation’s interest and excitement of aviation in its infancy by barnstorming over the eastern USA, giving rides ranging in price from a quarter to a dollar. He made his own airports by arranging with a farmer to use his field – after he landed in it! He endured many inconveniences such as spending a few hours in jail when a minister swore out a warrant against him for disturbing worship services. He participated in air racing, banner towing, stunt flying, and made over 50 parachute jumps. His extended aviation activities included giving flying lessons, charter flights, aerial photography and sight seeing trips until the rumblings of World War II caused changes to America. In 1940, Moss went to Washington, DC, with Bevo Howard, Bob Turner, and Colonel Roscoe Turner to set up a civilian pilot training program to teach college students to fly. This become the foundation of the Army Air Corps Training Program for WWII. From 1943-1944 he served as Basic Flying and instrument instructor under the United...
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Xen Motsinger

1997 Xen K. Motsinger was born in Lafayette, Ga., and he grew up in Taylorsville NC. Motsinger received his undergraduate degree from Maryville, TN and his graduate degree from Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. He moved to Columbia in 1957 to begin working for the Department of Health and Environmental Control. After 31 years, he retired from DHEC as director of certification. He has served 30 years in the U.S. Army Reserves. Motsinger served in WW II as an Aviation Cadet in the Army Air Corps. He earned his private license in 1952. He operated Sandhills Aero Club for more than 20 years, allowing many people the opportunity to learn to fly. Motsinger was also the co-owner of Eastwinds Airpark in Columbia. Motsinger has been a member of the South Carolina Breakfast Club for more than 30 years, and he is the cofounder and 32-year member of the EAA Chapter 242. He has judged many aviation contests, including Antique Airplanes at the Oshkosh International Air Show, Classic Airplanes at Sun Fun in Lakeland, Florida, Aeronica Fly-In and the EAA Chapter 3 Antique/Classics Fly-In. Motsinger has won many awards for his accomplishments in aviation. Some of those awards include the Oshkosh Lindy Award, BestO-65 HP Oshkosh HP Sun Fun, Palmetto Sport Aviation Man of the Year Award and the EAA Red McCord Award. He continues to judge antique air shows and serve as a field representative for the EAA Young Eagles...
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General Lloyd W. “Fig” Newton

1998 General Newton was born in Ridgeland, South Carolina, where he graduated from Jasper High School. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in aviation education and commissioned a Second Lieutenant from Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee in 1966. In 1985, he received a Master of Arts degree in Public Administration from George Washington University, Washington, D.C. The General is a command pilot with more than 4,000 flying hours in the T-37, T-38, F-4, F-15, F-16, C-12 and the F-117 stealth fighter. In 1968, he flew 269 combat missions in Vietnam and was selected to join the U.S. Air Force Aerial Demonstration Squadron, the Thunderbirds, in November 1974. From 1978 to 1982, he was assigned as an Air Force congressional liaison officer with the U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. He has commanded three wings, an air division and held numerous senior staff positions. He served as the Director of Operations, United States Special Operations Command and as the Assistant Vice Chief of Staff Headquarters U.S. Air Force. Newton culminated his Air Force career as the Commander, Air Education and Training Command where he was responsible for recruiting, training and education for all Air Force personnel. His command consisted of 13 bases, 43,000 active duty personnel and 14,000 civilians. Lloyd W. “Fig” Newton, General USAF (Ret) is the Vice President for International Programs and Business Development for Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Connecticut. As Vice President, he is responsible for international military sales, assessing U.S. military requirements and developing business for Pratt’s military engine services. He leads a team of 45 personnel who manages a host of domestic and international customers with a sales target of nearly $1 Billion. Thunderbird’s First African American Pilot Becomes Four-Star General WASHINGTON — When he was a teenager, Air Force Gen. Lloyd W. “Fig” Newton’s father asked him and his brothers, “What’s the most important four-letter word in the English language?” The boys scratched their heads in deep thought, toying with such words as “love.” “No!” he said to all their answers. “The word is ‘know,’ as in ‘knowledge.’ ” “He told us, the more you know, the better off you’re going to be,” said Newton, 54, currently the Air Force’s only African-American four-star general. “And now, I invite all youngsters to ‘know.’ “For an individual who only went through the second grade, my dad was a very bright man with...
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A. Lee Orr

2001 Lee Orr entered the aviation field in 1950, and she obtained her private pilot certificate in 1965. Over the years, she has taught nearly 1,000 people how to fly, and hundreds of those people are in the Spartanburg area. In 1971, Orr joined the Arkansas Chapter of the Ninety Nines, the women pilots’ organization, and she helped charter the Blue Ridge Chapter. She has held many leadership positions in the organization, as well as secretary and governor on both the national regional levels. From 1989 to 1996, she served on the International Board of Directors. A veteran of many air races, Orr has competed in the All Women’s Transcontinental Air Race (AWTAR), the Air Race Classis and the Powder Puff Derby. In 1988, she received the Amelia Earhart scholarship. With more than 25,000 hours of flying time, she has served as a role model for women in aviation as well as a mentor for countless pilots and colleagues. She has dedicated her entire flying life to the people of South Carolina, working with her local students and sending them off to aviation careers and hobbies across the world. Through her dedication to the field, both in instruction and safety, many pilots have come to know the freedom and responsibilities of...
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Carolyn M. Pilaar

1997 Carolyn Pilaar is an outstanding aviator and, over the years, she has achieved goals that others only dream about. Pilaar became interested in aviation while attending Western Michigan University. She received her private pilot’s license in the college flying club and immediately started with the University flight training program, staying in college for an additional major in aviation. She bought her first airplane, a 1946 Luscombe 8A that she flew for many years, in 1969 and completely restored everything. She even recovered the fabric wings. In 1972, she completed her aviation training, graduated from college and moved to Greenville, where she worked as a company pilot and flight instructor. In 1973, she was chief pilot for a FAR 135 certificate in a Beech 18 taildragger. Pilaar began Carolyn’s Flight Academy, which she continues to operate today, in 1974. She has also taught aviation courses at Greenville Technical College. Over the years, she has participated in such events as the All Women’s Transcontinental Air Race Classic, and she has earned many achievements in aviation and her community. She was named South Carolina’s Flight Instructor of the Year in 1976. Pilaar’s work as a pilot as well as an instructor has contributed significantly to the aviation community. The United States Precision Flying Team (USPFT) championships were held June 5-8, 1985 in Kissimmee, Florida, to select five pilots to represent the U.S. in the Sixth World Precision Flying Championships. Foothills Chapter 99 Carolyn Pilaar was the overall winner to lead the U.S. team. Eight out of the 32 competitors were women, all 99s. The 1985 World Precision Flying Competitions (WPFC) in August were also hosted by the 99s. Jody McCarrell, USPFT and WPFC chief navigation Judge, reported that the chief of the World Jury, Peter Nissen, observed, as 99s came from everywhere, that he had never seen so many women involved in such an event and doing such a great job. Please welcome the following new US Airways pilots: December 7, 1998 class (nine pilots): Donald C. Martin, Douglass A. Wells, Carolyn M. Pilaar, William A. Lehmann, Peter S. Lothrop, Arnold B. Green, Michael A. Engel, Mark J. Aikens, Denez...
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Len Povey

1991 A self taught pilot, Povey’s official introduction came in 1922 in the Army Air Service, where he was one of the first enlisted pilots. After a Miami air show in 1934, he was invited to inspect Cuba’s air facilities and pilots, and later he became head of the Cuban Air Force. He originated the Cuban Eight aerial maneuver. During World War II, he served as vice president of Eastern Aviation. Most recently, he served as director of public relations for Stevens Aviation in...
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Robert (Bob) C. Pulliam

2000 Robert (Bob) Pulliam has successfully transferred his passion for aviation into public service, including leadership roles in the aviation industry. As past chairman of the Columbia Metropolitan Airport Commission, his leadership provided support for extensive airport expansion and remodeling, increasing flights into the Midlands from 24 to 61 flights a day. Pulliam’s knowledge of aviation includes everything from the grounds to government regulations. He has raised community awareness of the impact that air transportation plays in economic development. His commitment to air transportation as a key component to economic development is best recognized in his service as chairman of the Airport Commission’s Economic Development Committee and as a member of the Central Carolina Economic Development Alliance. Pulliam’s passion for flying is best exemplified by his personal contributions of time and resources to flying numerous hours of humanitarian flights. He participates in the sponsorship of the Jamil Shrine Temple’s Fling Fezzes, donating aircraft and personal flying hours to transport the needy. He has also helped raise thousands of dollars to fund other similar operations. In 2000, he was named South Carolina Aviator of the...
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