RUNWAY IMPROVEMENTS AT HILTON HEAD AIRPORT ENHANCE SAFETY, SERVICE OPTIONS & STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

    Author: Ken Wysocky Published in: May-June 2018 A $14.1 million runway extension project at Hilton Head Island Airport (HHH) will enhance safety and allow the South Carolina airfield to accommodate larger aircraft. At the same time, the project also offers a practical blueprint for how to address local sentiment that runs counter to FAA recommendations. The project, expected to end in late June, adds 700 feet to HHH’s only runway (403 feet on one end and 297 on the other end), extending it to 5,000 feet. The additional length enabled American Airlines—the airport’s only commercial carrier—to replace its Dash 8 turboprop service with regional jet service via 76-passenger Embraer 175s. That provides residents and tourists with more travel options, says Jon Rembold, airport director for HHH and nearby Beaufort County Airport. “In addition, we now can receive private aircraft from airports that are farther away than before, because the longer runway allows them to carry more fuel and people on board. It opens up their range,” Rembold points out. The new length also makes HHH more competitive with Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport, located about 45 miles southwest, and Charleston International Airport, located about 100 miles northeast, both which have runways more than 9,000 feet long, he adds. facts&figures Project: Runway Improvements Location: Hilton Head Island (SC) Airport 2017 Enplanements/Deplanements: 27,332/30,553 Key Components: 700-foot runway extension; stormwater detention system; 2 engineered material arresting systems Runway Extension: $14.1 million Stormwater System: $5.4 million Arresting Beds: $8 million Funding: 90% FAA; 5% state; 5% airport revenue Engineering Consultant: Talbert, Bright & Ellington Engineering: Ward Edwards Engineering Prime Contractor: Quality Enterprises USA Stormwater Chambers: CULTEC Key Benefits: Improved safety; ability to accommodate larger aircraft/provide more travel options to passengers; enhanced stormwater management & wildlife mitigation Along with the runway extension, the airport installed a new $5.4 million stormwater management system that stores, treats and transports rainwater downstream via a system of large underground plastic chambers. Stormwater management is critical because HHH sits amid an 81,000-acre environmentally sensitive watershed that includes the Calibogue Sound, three rivers and their tributaries, creeks, lakes and tidal flats. As such, the area is home to wildlife such as ospreys, bald eagles and dolphins. The new system, which replaced a drainage canal adjacent to the airport’s runway, also serves as a wildlife mitigation tool, because there is no longer standing water to attract animals such as foxes,...
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SCHAF Newsletter July 2018

Click here to view SCHAF Newsletter July 2018
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Memorial Service honoring Gerald Ballard on June 23, 2018

You are cordially invited to the Memorial Service honoring Gerald Ballard, President of the South Carolina Breakfast Club (November 1979 – December 2017). The Service will be held on June 23, 2018 at Twin Lakes Airport (S17) – 132 Ballard Drive, Trenton, SC 29847. Agenda: 11:00 am – Arrival and Fellowship 12:00 pm – Lunch catered by Sconyer’s Bar-B-Que 1:00 pm – Service and Speakers 2:00 pm – Military Honor 2:15 pm – Missing Man Formation 2:30 pm- Lottery Drawing 3:00 pm – Adjourn Click the link for more details:...
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The South Carolina Flight Standard District Office – Educational Outreach to Identify Suspected Illegal Charter Flights

Unfortunately, there have been instances where unsuspecting members of the public have chartered aircraft for flights only to find out after the fact that the operators of these flights were not legally qualified, i.e., not certificated, to conduct those flights.   Unscrupulous entities have used many schemes to ostensibly legitimize the flight, i.e., illicit and/or devious lease agreements, conditional sales contracts, operational control conveyances, etc. Regrettably, many members of the public simply are not aware that an operator must possess and display either an “Operating Certificate” or “Air Carrier Certificate.”  Moreover, many members of the public have chartered a flight and unwittingly accepted the responsibilities of “operational control” when they were not aware that “operational control” involved:   1.     Flight Crewmember Selection; 2.     Manual Control; 3.     Flight Planning; 4.     Airworthiness of Aircraft; 5.     Flight Release; 6.     Flight Locating; and 7.     Flight Information   This knowing or unknowing assumption of the responsibility of operational control creates a serious problem in air safety and involves substantial legal liabilities for the unsuspecting user who has become a victim of an uncertificated operator.   Therefore, in an effort inform members of the public accordingly, SC FSDO personnel will convey the requirements of legitimate operators to possess and display their Operating Certificate or Air Transportation Certificate and that the operators are responsible for all matters concerning operational control.  SC FSDO personnel will post informational posters at FBOs throughout the District of SC (see attachment).  Any questions may be directed to the SC FSDO at (803)...
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Due to the weather the Anderson Regional Airshow has been canceled on Saturday, May 19.

Due to the weather the Anderson Regional Airshow has been canceled on Saturday, May 19. A full schedule remains in play for Sunday, May 20. Gates open at 10 a.m., and the show is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m.  ...
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New Advisory standardizes non-towered flight operations

MAY 7, 2018 BY GENERAL AVIATION NEWS STAFF A new Advisory Circular standardizes traffic pattern altitudes and procedures at airports without operating control towers. Advisory Circular (AC) 90-66B, Non-Towered Airport Flight Operations, replaces two advisories: One from 1993 that addressed traffic patterns, and another from 1990 that provided communication guidance, according to officials with the National Business Aviation Association. “No matter what a pilot flies – turbine, piston, parachute, glider, ultralight, lighter-than-air or unmanned aircraft system – they should read this AC, because it clearly presents the standards for operating at a non-towered airport,” said Richard Boll, a member of the NBAA Access Committee. “Not only does it guide the operation of a pilot’s particular aircraft, it gives the expectation of how pilots of other aircraft using the non-towered airport will operate.” Standardizing the traffic pattern altitude was a primary focus of the members of the FAA’s Aeronautical Charting Forum, said Boll. Noting the age of the previous guidance, he said the old standard was 800′ to 1,000′ above ground level (AGL). To eliminate that 200′ of confusion, the ACF set the standard at 1,000′ AGL, with left-hand turns, unless terrain or obstacles mandate otherwise. Large and turbine-powered airplanes should enter the traffic pattern at an altitude of 1,500′ AGL, or 500′ above the established pattern altitude. A recent change to the Aeronautical Information Manual introduced this standard, and the AC expands on it. Cessna 172 Skyhawk. (Photo courtesy Cessna) Entering the non-tower traffic pattern and self-announcing a flight’s position and the pilot’s intentions received equal detail and attention. It makes clear that airplanes terminating an instrument procedure with a straight-in approach do not have the right of way over VFR traffic in the pattern, said Boll. And when circling to land, left-hand turns are standard, unless otherwise documented. The committee’s goal was to improve safety for all by standardizing operational practices and getting everyone who uses non-towered airports on the same 18 pages of the new advisory circular, Boll said. “Everyone seems to focus on towered airport operations, but most of America’s more than 5,000 public-use airports do not have a tower, so safety depends on the pilots flying into them,” Boll said. Click here for more...
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SCHAF NEWSLETTER FOR APRIL 2018

Reminder: The next SCHAF Open House will be on Saturday, April 14th, from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm at Hangar Y-1 at Owens Field Airport. Foundation Happenings: We are sad to report that our illustrious secretary, Dave McIntosh is having medical issues, so we are filling some big shoes while he is recovering.Our prayers and concerns are with both Dave and his wife, Mary. We wish him a very speedy recovery. He is greatly missed! This month’s newsletter will look a little different. It is taking three of us to make up for one Dave! The board of directors at the South Carolina Historic Aviation Foundation met on March 17, 2018. Board members present were Ken Berry, Ron Skipper and Katherine Cuddy. SCHAF members present were Niall McLaughlin, Chris Gillam, David Moxley and John Chamberlain. At our March open house, we had several special guests. Ellen and Carl Nagy along with Tim Sinclair, relatives and friends of the Dan Rossman family, stopped by to see the work on GF2. They were visiting from Pennsylvania and shared some great stories about Dan Rossman. Also at the open house was Rev Matt Yon, son of Larry Yon. Larry was one of our founding board members who recently passed away. Matt delivered some fantastic reference material about the raising of GF2 from Lake Greenwood and the original restoration. There is some wonderful information about the beginnings of the restoration of GF2. Click here for the full...
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Young Aviators Fly-in

Young Aviators Fly-in SAVE THE DATES:  JUNE 8-10 2018 Calling all young adults and youth in aviation for the first annual Young Aviators Fly-In at Triple Tree Aerodrome! Any age is welcome (including the young at heart) to come and celebrate the next generation of aviators. Aircraft and guests can begin arriving on Friday, June 8th at 9 AM and the event will conclude on Sunday, June 10th at 5 PM. On Saturday, June 9th, we will be hosting various aviation organizations including aviation colleges, clubs, and youth programs from around the country for a “Youth Day”. As of early March several groups have already committed to attending. Textron Aviation, Auburn University, Middle Georgia State University, Averett University, Middle Tennessee State University, USAeroFlight, the Vintage Aircraft Association and Warbirds of America to name a few! We are looking forward to adding more vendors and seminars in the coming months. Also, be on the lookout for raffle announcements. We are planning on raffling off several rides in aircraft such as Staggerwings and Cabin Wacos! Come camp, fly, and hang out with fellow aviation enthusiasts at one of the world’s most beautiful grass strips! There will be no landing fee or daily admission fee, however food trucks will be on site each day to provide a great meal. Each attendee is responsible for paying for their own meal. On Saturday and Sunday a continental breakfast will be provided for a low cost. An event specific T-shirt will be available for purchase as well. Come on out and enjoy the beauty and charm of Triple Tree, all while supporting the next generation! More information coming soon for this great young aviators event. Please check back in the coming months. Cayla McLeod Cayla1127@gmail.com Ryan Hunt hunt.paulryan@gmail.com (404) 805-6719 Please Thank our supporters that are making this event possible. TTA AOPA EAA Carbon Cub   For more information click...
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Join together to train S.C. students for workforce BY EMERSON SMITH

Join together to train S.C. students for workforce BY EMERSON SMITH Bobby Hitt, head of our Department of Commerce, is very proud of his bringing aerospace companies to South Carolina, but he has failed to motivate the General Assembly to improve public schools. Nonetheless, Frank Hatten, an education relations specialist at Boeing, is taking a direct approach to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics in public schools and build a pipeline of South Carolinians working in the aerospace industry. I met Hatten on a recent group visit to the mammoth Boeing plant in North Charleston. We took a bus through the initial checkpoint and drove around an assortment of giant white buildings. We saw an array of new Boeing 787 aircraft sitting on a ramp, each in the distinctive colors and logos of airlines from around the world. Inside the final assembly building, we were escorted to a top floor classroom. There, we were shown camera pods and microphones in the ceiling and admonished that what we said or did would be recorded. No photos allowed. What followed was a 45-minute PowerPoint lecture on how Boeing works with high school students in South Carolina to encourage them to learn more about aerospace theory, science, design, assembly, flight and evaluation and to be eligible for training that could lead to a job at Boeing. This is all impressive, just the effort that Boeing makes to get high school students qualified to work at this Boeing plant of about 7,000 workers. After the lecture, we were escorted to the second floor, where, for a few minutes, we could look down, unobstructed, on the six or so aircraft being fitted with interiors and engines. We were told that our group, members of the S.C. Aviation Association, was indeed fortunate to be able to visit the plant, since visits are highly restricted. We would not be allowed to tour the shop floor, we discovered, since that is a privilege, Hatten said, extended only to potential aircraft purchasers. I draw three conclusions. First is that the Boeing facility is secure. Second, that Boeing is investing, with a good return, in the education of secondary school students. Third is that our public schools are the weakest link when Boeing and other plants need to find educated and trainable workers. BMW, the first, in 1993, of a series of automotive assembly plants in South Carolina, has...
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SCHAF Newsletter for March 2018

Click here to view the full SCHAF Newsletter for March 2018....
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Greenville Downtown Airport Lifts Our Local Economy

Greenville Downtown Airport Lifts Our Local Economy The South Carolina Aeronautics Commission has released a Statewide Aviation System Plan and Economic Impact Report.  It concludes that South Carolina’s network of 57 publicly owned airports contribute $16.3 billion annually to our state and local economies, while supporting almost 165,000 jobs. In the findings, it was determined that last year the Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU) had the following direct and indirect/induced economic impact: Employment:  547 (up from 453 in 2006 when last study was done) Payroll:  $24.9 million (up from $13.4 million in 2006 when last study was done) Economic Activity:  $68.8 million (up from $35.2 million in 2006 when last study was done) “We all know our system of airports connects us to the world and delivers vacation spending visitors to our great cities, coastal beaches and mountain regions, but we often don’t think about the parts and products aircraft bring here, which makes many types of manufacturing and other business possible in our state,” stated Joe Frasher, South Carolina Aviation Association Board Member and Airport Director of the Greenville Downtown Airport.  “A strong case could be made that without airports, Boeing and BMW would not have landed in our state.  Both require parts delivered in a timely manner.  Transportation by land or sea might not be quick enough in this era of just-in-time inventory,” according to Frasher. ​​ The report notes that aviation supports about 7% of our state’s job market through direct employment and through companies that rely on aviation.  “Almost everyone in Greenville knows someone who works at Lockheed Martin.  These people would not be employed here if it weren’t for our local airports.  The same can be said for all the military aviation personnel our local airports and state host,” added Frasher. The study shows that, from various sources, airports directly generate $657 million dollars in state tax revenue.  It also reports that aviation demand is expected to grow and that airports need to be maintained and funding increased to support this mode of transportation’s infrastructure.  Based on previous funding history, the study determined that only 25-50% of the airports estimated annual needs will be available from the current state budget and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).  The FAA can supply 90% of the funding needed for eligible projects at airports if state and local funds are available to fund the remaining 10%. “Much like our...
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